Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using module pattern in javascript. Is it a way to create instances of a "class" ? I am using it in a right way ?

var moduleClass = (function () {
var a =5;
return {
getA: function () {
  console.log(a);
 }
};
})();
var instance = moduleClass;
instance.getA();

http://jsfiddle.net/PzLKy/ How can I pass parameters on new instances ?

share|improve this question
    
use a constructor function instead of a literal if you want to pass params at instantiation time. –  dandavis Jul 18 '13 at 19:34
    
There's no class-like construct involved in your code. You just have a singleton generated with the module pattern. What do you want - only then we can tell you the code is correct? –  Bergi Jul 18 '13 at 19:36
    
I want to be able to declare new instances and passing different values. I don't want to do something specific I am just learning. –  Petran Jul 18 '13 at 20:00
    
What shell that a be? A static variable that all instances will share? An instance variable? Usually you don't need the module pattern to create a class-like structure in JavaScript. –  Bergi Jul 18 '13 at 20:22

3 Answers 3

For creating instances you have to use the key word new with any function. This function aka Constructor can help you create multiple instances

var moduleClass = (function () {
var a =5;
return {
getA: function () {
  console.log(a);
 }
};
})();
var instance = new moduleClass;
instance.getA();

Constructor:Constructor functions are used with the new keyword, and they're one of the ways you give an object a prototype.

REFER-->

  1. Javascript Prototypes,objects,constructor??i am confused
  2. Constructors in JavaScript objects
share|improve this answer
    
You said yourself that new must be used with a function –  Bergi Jul 18 '13 at 19:38
    
did you try your code before posting? –  dandavis Jul 18 '13 at 19:39
    
ohh,i just totally missed the fiddle..going through it now!!! –  Jayesh Jain Jul 18 '13 at 19:40
    
@dandavis:sorry,last line was wrong,Edited the answer!!! –  Jayesh Jain Jul 18 '13 at 20:10
    
@MESSIAH: the code in the answer still throws a type error when i paste it into devtools... –  dandavis Jul 18 '13 at 21:15

You don't really need new here, Below is the right way to code to achieve what you are trying to achieve. Also, be really careful while using new, if used unwisely it can start clobbering your Global variable, If you want to use new, John Resig has a really nice explaination for how to do it the right way, for more read this article by John Resig http://ejohn.org/blog/simple-class-instantiation/

http://jsfiddle.net/PzLKy/2/

var moduleClass = (function () {
    var a =5;

  return {
      setA: function (inA) {
      a=inA;
    } ,
    getA: function () {
      alert(a);
    }

  };

})();


var instance = moduleClass;
instance.setA(8);
instance.getA();

Edit: contactmatt is right, definitely dont be afraid of using constructor, but here is some thing you need to be aware of

Taken from John Resig's article mentioned in the first paragraph,

suppose this is your code

function User(first, last){
    this.name = first + " " + last;
}

var user = new User("John", "Resig"); 
user.name // John Resig
var user2 = User ("first","last");
user2.name //undefined, also this would pollute your current scope

if you call the constructor, you would not get any kind of indication and can be a debugging nightmare.

a way to solve this is

function User(first, last){
  if ( this instanceof User ) {
    this.name = first + " " + last;
  } else
    return new User(first, last);
}

To Conclude,

So if you feel that constructor is the best way for your problem, use it. But be aware, also the simple class instantiation by John is a really useful pattern, try to go through it,he also explains generic constructor.

share|improve this answer
    
@pet Does this solve your problem, let me know if you have any question. –  user2580076 Jul 18 '13 at 19:49
    
It does but is the right way to do it ? If I have more variables that want to use am I forced to use something like init function ? –  Petran Jul 18 '13 at 20:01
    
@pet see edits... let me know if anything is unclear, I can explain if anything is fuzzy –  user2580076 Jul 18 '13 at 20:25
    
@pet did this help resolve your question? –  user2580076 Jul 19 '13 at 0:27

Use constructor functions. Don't be afraid of "new", just use it wisely.

Note: Standard naming convention is to name functions that will be used as function constructors with a capital letter. (i.e. ModuleClass instead of moduleClass)

function ModuleClass() {
  var a =5;
  return {
    getA: function () {
    console.log(a);
   }
  };
};

or if you're brave enough to learn about the 'this' keyword in JavaScript.

function ModuleClass() {
  var a =5;
  this.getA = function () {
    console.log(a);
  };
};

var instance = new moduleClass();
instance.getA();
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.