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I am new to android and learning java. In recent guide, i came across the method to toggle password field to normal text field.

Can someone please explain use of | in this statement ?

final EditText input = (EditText) findViewById(R.id.etCommands);

if(passTog.isChecked())
{
   input.setInputType(InputType.TYPE_CLASS_TEXT | InputType.TYPE_TEXT_VARIATION_PASSWORD);
}else {
   input.setInputType(InputType.TYPE_CLASS_TEXT);
}

Any help regarding this will be much appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Edit:

I need to know how this Bitwise OR is working infact here ? Here is complete code to avoid ambiguity regarding the variables:

protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);

    setContentView(R.layout.text);

    Button checkCommand = (Button)findViewById(R.id.bResults);
    final ToggleButton passTog = (ToggleButton) findViewById(R.id.tbPassword);
    final EditText input = (EditText) findViewById(R.id.etCommands);
    TextView display = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.tvResults);

    passTog.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {

        @Override
        public void onClick(View arg0) {
            // TODO Auto-generated method stub

            if(passTog.isChecked()){
                input.setInputType(InputType.TYPE_CLASS_TEXT | InputType.TYPE_TEXT_VARIATION_PASSWORD);
            }else {
                input.setInputType(InputType.TYPE_CLASS_TEXT);
            }

        }
    });

}
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closed as off-topic by Adriano Repetti, Jonathan Naguin, jahroy, Jim Lewis, Graviton Jul 19 '13 at 3:27

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4  
Bitwise OR –  Rohit Jain Jul 18 '13 at 20:42
1  
I'm sure somewhere I saw a manual... –  Adriano Repetti Jul 18 '13 at 20:43
2  
@JohnStrickler - Because... Why on earth would you ask this question without googling first? (regardless of your level of experience) For the record, I did not downvote. Though I'm tempted to... My gut reaction would be to google ["java operators")[docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/nutsandbolts/…) –  jahroy Jul 18 '13 at 20:57
4  
From the very top of the documentation: "A password field with with the password visible to the user: inputType = TYPE_CLASS_TEXT | TYPE_TEXT_VARIATION_VISIBLE_PASSWORD" It's literally the first thing mentioned on this page. –  jahroy Jul 18 '13 at 21:17
2  
Absoutely not. This question is the epitome of "shows no effort". People who search with similar questions should find the Android documentation, not this question. –  jahroy Jul 18 '13 at 21:24

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

That code isn't using | in an if statement. It's using it in the body of an if statement which is very different. When used there, it's a bitwise-or operation. Edit: @RohitJain has provided a much better link than mine in his comment: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bitwise_operation#OR


If it were used in an if statement like so:

if (foo() | bar())

that means "don't short circuit". If foo() returned "true" it will still evaluate bar(). If you used || and foo() returns "true", it won't evaluate bar() because it knows the result of the if statement will be "true" no matter what else happens.


For your specific question, you can see the possible values of InputType here.

InputType.TYPE_CLASS_TEXT = Constant Value: 1 (0x00000001)
InputType.TYPE_TEXT_VARIATION_PASSWORD = Constant Value: 128 (0x00000080)

Using this tool, I've calculated the result of a bitwise or will be: 129. To see how to get that value, read the wikipedia article above.

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Can you please explain how | is working in that statement ? input.setInputType(InputType.TYPE_CLASS_TEXT | InputType.TYPE_TEXT_VARIATION_PASSWORD); –  Shumail Mohy-ud-Din Jul 18 '13 at 20:49
    
I'd need to know the values of InputType.TYPE_CLASS_TEXT and InputType.TYPE_TEXT_VARIATION_PASSWORD to be able to do that. But you can use this link to get the general idea: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bitwise_operation#OR –  tieTYT Jul 18 '13 at 20:51
    
I have pretty good idea of Bitwise OR (studied in Digital Logic Design)- What i am unable to understand, why it's being used here ? –  Shumail Mohy-ud-Din Jul 18 '13 at 20:55
    
What class is input? I'd need to know that to answer that. –  tieTYT Jul 18 '13 at 21:01
    
input is actually a variable final EditText input = (EditText) findViewById(R.id.etCommands); –  Shumail Mohy-ud-Din Jul 18 '13 at 21:02

That's bitwise OR Operator - See this for details

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The "|" symbol is defined as bitwise inclusive OR

Source: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/nutsandbolts/operators.html

The | (bitwise inclusive OR) operator compares the values (in binary format) of each operand and yields a value whose bit pattern shows which bits in either of the operands has the value 1. If both of the bits are 0, the result of that bit is 0; otherwise, the result is 1.

Source: http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/comphelp/v7v91/index.jsp?topic=%2Fcom.ibm.vacpp7a.doc%2Flanguage%2Fref%2Fclrc05bitiore.htm

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|  is a Bitwise inclusive OR
|| is a Conditional-OR

A bitwise OR takes two bit patterns of equal length and performs the logical inclusive OR operation on each pair of corresponding bits. The result in each position is 1 if the first bit is 1 or the second bit is 1 or both bits are 1; otherwise, the result is 0. For example:

   0101 (decimal 5)
OR 0011 (decimal 3)
 = 0111 (decimal 7)

Check this and this out.

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| is also non-short circuited conditional OR –  Steve Kuo Jul 18 '13 at 20:47
    
Thanks. I have a good idea of Bitwise OR - Studied in Digital Logic Design subject. What i am unable to understand is it's use here ? input.setInputType(InputType.TYPE_CLASS_TEXT | InputType.TYPE_TEXT_VARIATION_PASSWORD); –  Shumail Mohy-ud-Din Jul 18 '13 at 20:58
    
Very strange usage tbh, it looks like its setting the input type to be whatever results in bitwise combining the TYPE_CLASS_TEXT and TYPE_TEXT_VARIATION_PASSWORD. It looks like InputType must be an enum so I guess it allows you to work with more complex input types without having to include them in InputType? Possibly a way to evaluate types in a situation where there could be millions of potencial types that can't be included in the enum? –  Mr D Jul 18 '13 at 21:07

The first thing you should always do is consult the documentation.

Here is a link to the documentation for InputType

Here is the first thing on the page:

A password field with with the password visible to the user:

    inputType = TYPE_CLASS_TEXT | TYPE_TEXT_VARIATION_VISIBLE_PASSWORD

It's literally the third sentence on the page.

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| means bitwise OR

|| means logical OR

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Are you sure? There is more than one logical OR –  Steve Kuo Jul 18 '13 at 20:48
    
huh? I don't understand what's the other logical OR? –  tallen Jul 18 '13 at 21:01

The | is BITWISE OR'ing the constants InputType.TYPE_CLASS_TEXT and InputType.TYPE_TEXT_VARIATION_PASSWORD. I'm assuming that those two constants are ints used to identify internal types the EditText object cares about, given the formatting, but it could be any variable type. If you really want to know exactly what it's doing, you would need to know the data type of InputType.TYPE_CLASS_TEXT, but we can assume thanks common practices of Java code that it is sticking constants together for a comparison later.

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