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According to this answer at stackoverflow, the generic type in C# is resolved at runtime.

However, according to this answer, in C#, the generic type is resolved at compile time.

What am I missing here?

In other words, is the type T resolved at compile time or run time?

Update:

Based on Oded's answer, In a case like this, where the type is a closed concrete type (which means it would be resolved at compile time)

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        var t = new Test<int>();
    }  
}

public class Test<T>
{   
}

will the MSIL have the equivalent of

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        var t = new Test();
    }
}

public class Test<int>
{        
}
share|improve this question
3  
Those two posts you link to actually are describing different concepts. – JerKimball Jul 18 '13 at 21:31
2  
What part of this from the posted answer in the link you provided do you not understand No; that's fundamentally impossible. The whole point of generics is that they create compile-time types. You're trying to create a type which is unknown at compile time. You can do it using reflection, though. (typeof(MyClass<>).MakeGenericType(myType)) – MethodMan Jul 18 '13 at 21:31
1  
Then you'll need to clearly define what it means for a type to be "resolved", because apparently at least two people are using it to mean at least two different things. I do not know what characterizes a "resolved" type. I know what characterizes overload resolution; is that what you mean by a type being "resolved"? – Eric Lippert Jul 18 '13 at 21:39
4  
The answer to your updated question is no. The constructed generic type is not created until runtime. At compile time the compiler will determine that int is a legal argument corresponding to T, and that's all. Moreover: the body of Test<T> must contain code that can be compiled given any possible value for T, not just the values that appear in Main. This is one of the main differences between generics and templates. – Eric Lippert Jul 18 '13 at 21:47
1  
up vote 20 down vote accepted

The problem is that the question is not well-posed. Two people are claiming opposite things: that types are "resolved" at runtime and that types are "resolved" at compile time.

Since they are contradicting each other, they must both mean something different by "resolved".

I do not know what it means for a type to be "resolved". I do know however what overload resolution is. When asked to solve an overload resolution problem that does not involve dynamic, the C# compiler determines which overload to call at compile time, based on the compile time information about the generic type. So for example, if you have:

static void Main()
{
    var d = new D();
    var p = new P<D>();
    p.N(d);//Displays In class B
}


class B
{
    public void M()// Note, not virtual
    {
        Console.WriteLine("In class B");
    }
} 

class D : B
{
    public new void M()// new, not overload
    {
        Console.WriteLine("In class D");
    }
} 

class P<T> where T : B
{
    public  void N(T t)
    {
        t.M();
    }
}

N always calls B.M even if P<T> is instantiated as P<D>. Why? Because the overload resolution problem that determines what the meaning of t.M is must be solved when P<T>.N is compiled, and at that time, the best the compiler knows is that t must be B, so it chooses B.M.

If that's not what you mean by "resolved" then clarify the question.

share|improve this answer
    
Does you example show overload resolution or binding? While binding requires overload resolution, the only two methods which with name M have identical signatures, so "overload resolution" would only have one candidate to work with. I think a better example for "overload resolution" might be static bool Compare<T>(T p1, T p2) where T:class { return p1 == p2;} ... Compare("5", 5.ToString()). Since the compiler can't know that T will be of type String, it can't know that it should use String-vs-String overload of == rather than perform a reference comparison? – supercat Jul 19 '13 at 15:21
    
BTW, is the reference-comparison of == an overload, or is it some other kind of compiler magic? An overload of == which took parameters of type Object would allow any two types to be compared, but the C# == operator doesn't work like that. Its behavior seems quite different from anything that could be achieved via normal overload resolution. – supercat Jul 19 '13 at 15:27
    
@supercat: Good question. It actually does use normal operator overload resolution with some small modifications. First, expressions of the form x==null, null!=x and so on are handled specially. Then overload resolution happens normally. Then there is a post-resolution validation step. If overload resolution chooses the object==object operator and one or both operands are not of reference type then an error condition is triggered. (This brief sketch does not describe all the subtleties; see the spec for details.) – Eric Lippert Jul 19 '13 at 15:31
    
@EricLippert, seeing this answer makes me have doubts on my own answer to a related question ( stackoverflow.com/questions/17817979/… ). and you certainly seem like someone who could weigh in on that question; maybe even provide the correct answer – nicholas Jul 26 '13 at 2:53
    
@Nicholas: I will be answering that question on the Coverity Development Testing blog's new feature "Ask the Bug Guys" next week. I'll post a link when I do. The short answer is: there is no good reason why that scenario should not work; it is a likely bug in either the compiler or the specification. – Eric Lippert Jul 26 '13 at 14:52

You are missing the concepts of open and closed generic types.

Essentially, a closed generic type is when you actually specify existing types on a generic parameter/s (or they are inferred by the compiler). For example:

Nullable<int> nulInt;

An open generic type is one where one or more generic type is to be determined during runtime (so, the Nullable<T> class is an example).

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Ah, durn it - you beat me to it. :) – JerKimball Jul 18 '13 at 21:31
  1. the first answer is about method parameters
  2. and the second is about generic type parameters

this is what you're missing.

more precisely: 1. C# is statically typed by default, so when passing parameters you'll get the best fitting type and method. (Also check out the answer about "dynamic" parameters.) 2. Setting a generic type parameter by the C# syntax is about static types. Setting it by reflection is about something else.

something else: "in .NET" each type has an initialization phase at its first usage at runtime. (see static fields and static constructor)

so: All types are initialized at runtime, but static types are used (or dynamic...) at compile-time that's when they need to be "resolved".

share|improve this answer

Open types (myclass<T>) do not exist run time. But unbound types can exist at run time (myclass<>). To resolve an unbound type at runtime , you need to use typeof operator.

In other words, unless typeof operator is used, generic types are closed at compile time.

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