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I'm maintaining a website which has a series of forms that user submits. Each form does an HTTP POST to the server, which then renders the next form to the browser.

i.e., index.html contains a <form action="form1.php" method="post">, and then form1.php renders a <form action="form2.php" method="post">, etc.

When I navigate using the back button from say, form2.php to form1.php on my iPhone, the request is an HTTP GET for form1.php, rather than a resubmit using HTTP POST.

This happens intermittently, but more reliably if I minimize safari and then re-open it again before I hit the 'back' button.

Note: This happens whether I'm using chrome or safari on my iPhone.

My expectation was that these requests would be resubmitted using POST. Is that wrong?

I have a small repro set up here: http://kong.idlemonkeys.net/~shaun/fi/

Sources -- sorry about some of the extra cruft, but they should convey the point.

index.html:

<html>
    <head>
        <script src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.10.2/jquery.min.js"></script>
    </head>
    <body>
        <form id="start-form" method="post" action="form1.php">
            <input type="hidden" name="foo" value="bar"/>
        </form>
        <div id="click-me" style="width: 200px; height: 200px; background-color: pink;">Click me</div>
    </body>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        $(document).ready(function() {
            $('#click-me').click(function() {
                $('#start-form').unbind('submit').submit();
            });
        });
    </script>
</html>

form1.php:

<html>
    <head>
        <script src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.10.2/jquery.min.js"></script>
    </head>
    <body>
<?php if($_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] !== 'POST') { ?>
<h2> you're doing it wrong </h2>
<?php } ?>
        <h1> This is form 1: <?php echo time(); ?></h1>
        <h1> You requested this page with: <?php echo $_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] ?></h1>
        <form id="form1" method="post" action="form2.php">
            <button type="submit" value="submit" name="submit">Submit</button>
        </form>
    </body>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        $(document).ready(function() {
            $('#form1').submit(function () {
                alert('starting form submit');
            });
        });
    </script>
</html>

form2.php:

<html>
    <body>
        <h1> This is form 2: <?php echo time(); ?></h1>
        <h1> You requested this page with: <?php echo $_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] ?></h1>
        <form method="post" action="form3.php">
            <button type="submit" value="submit" name="submit">Submit</button>
        </form>
    </body>
</html>

Repro Steps:

  1. Load http://kong.idlemonkeys.net/~shaun/fi/ in safari or chrome on iOS
  2. Click the 'click me' button, which submits a POST to form1.php
  3. Click the 'submit' button, which submits a POST to form2.php
  4. Minimize safari (i.e., go to the home screen), then bring it back up.
  5. Hit the 'back' button, notice that form1.php now informs you it was fetched via HTTP GET

I've been able to confirm the sequence of events using wireshark

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

My expectation was that these requests would be resubmitted using POST. Is that wrong?

I believe it is wrong. POST requests may not be idempotent, i.e. issuing the same post multiple times may change the state of the server each time, and that can be dangerous. The browser has no way of knowing whether you really intend to resubmit the form that got you to the current page, for example, so it can't assume that it's safe to send the POST again. Instead, it uses a GET because a GET won't affect the state of the server.

This very StackOverflow page is a fine example. After I click the 'save' button at the bottom, my browser will no doubt issue a POST to send my answer to the server, and then show me the resulting web page that includes my new answer. If I hit the back button, should my browser again issue the POST? That could result in a whole new copy of my answer being added, which doesn't seem like the right thing to do at all. Using a GET, on the other hand, will safely reload the previous page without resending my answer.

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This makes good sense, but any idea why it works differently for desktop browsers? Safari/Chrome/Firefox/IE all cache the page and don't even bother doing a resubmit. If I disable the cache (in chrome at least), it does resubmit the request. I have a feeling sites like stackoverflow issue a redirect after the POST because they're maintaining server-side state. In this particular application, the state is only maintained in the client-rendered forms. –  l8nite Jul 19 '13 at 0:15
    
Fwiw, I added Cache-Control: no-cache, no-store to the responses, and now chrome prompts me to resubmit, but ios safari still blindly issues a GET instead. –  l8nite Jul 22 '13 at 19:28

It is probably a good idea to always send HTTP 302 redirect after POST то avoid this sort of inconsistent browser behavior http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post/Redirect/Get

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