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I've been designing classes that all follow the idiom that their shared pointer type is available in their namespace using code like this:

class ClassName
  {
  public:
    typedef std::shared_ptr<ClassName> ptr;
  }

making it possible to write code like this:

ClassName::ptr p=std::make_shared<ClassName>();

Now, I'd like to factor that code into a base class. It'll let me magically add weak_ptr support in just one place, and will indicate which classes conform to this protocol, and generally make it easier to build out the capabilities.

Am I forced into using templates?

One way is to follow the enable_shared_from_this<> approach.

template <typename T>
class SmartPointer
  {
  public:
    typedef std::shared_ptr<T> ptr;
    typedef std::weak_ptr<T>   wptr;
  }

allowing me to define classes like this:

class ClassName:public SmartPointer<ClassName>
   ...

but it strikes me as clumsy to have to specify ClassName as the template parameter. What I'd like to do is be able to identify the type of the derived class at compile time, substituting in for derivedClassType() below:

class SmartPointer
  {
  public:
    typedef std:shared_ptr<derivedClassType()> ptr;
    typedef std:weak_ptr<derivedClassType()>   wptr;
  }

class ClassName: public SmartPointer
  ...

it seems like the compiler must know that information at compile time as a sort of implied template parameter... This has the added benefit of ensuring the type referenced is the derived class and not a base class.

Is there a syntax that would make this possible?

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5  
No​​​​​​​​​​​​​. –  Rapptz Jul 18 '13 at 23:47
1  
Why? auto p=std::make_shared<ClassName>(); is easier, and doesn't require any of whatever it is you're doing. –  Mooing Duck Jul 18 '13 at 23:51
2  
And, interestingly enough, the compiler does not know that information at compile time, because SmartPointer has no base class. It is the base class. –  Mooing Duck Jul 18 '13 at 23:53
    
C++11? As an aside, you are asking for compiler automatic crtp. Which does not exist. –  Yakk Jul 18 '13 at 23:56
1  
@MooingDuck I'm not a huge fan of auto in anything but trivial cases. Maybe with time I'll change my mind, but my experience with letting compilers detect type in Haskell suggest that after a few layers of auto-typing things start to get shaky. I find it more valuable to be explicit and get warned early of errors. –  G B Jul 19 '13 at 1:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The approach used by enable_shared_from_this is called CRTP, the "curiously recurring template pattern." You need to specify the derived class; there is no way for a base class template to ask who is using it as a base class.

But you could inherit from enable_shared_from_this in your CRTP base and avoid specifying the derived class name twice.

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So, I'm going to cheat by changing your syntax.

template<typename T>
using Ptr = T::template ptr<T>;
template<typename T>
using WPtr = T::template wptr<T>;

struct Pointerable {
  template<typename T>
  using ptr = std::shared_ptr<T>;
  template<typename T>
  using wptr = std::weak_ptr<T>;
};

class Foo : public Pointerable {

};

Ptr<Foo> x = std::make_shared<Foo>( ... );
WPtr<Foo> y = x;

here, the only purpose of Pointerable is to tag your types that you want to be used. Ptr<Foo> and WPtr<Foo> could be written to work on any class:

template<typename T>
using Ptr = std::shared_ptr<T>;
template<typename T>
using WPtr = std::weak_ptr<T>;

but I suppose you want to be able to tag objects as "managed by smart pointers" for whatever reason.

We could even make Pointerable completely empty, if you don't like that template boilerplate in it:

struct Pointerable {};

and add a traits class:

template<typename T>
struct is_pointerable : std::is_base_of<Pointerable, T> {};

which we then use:

template<typename T, typename=typename std::enable_if< is_pointerable<T>::value >::type >
using Ptr = std::shared_ptr<T>;

but I think the boilerplate works better -- SFINAE using seems overkill.

share|improve this answer
    
Template aliases can't be overloaded, and I don't think SFINAE applies to them. –  Potatoswatter Jul 19 '13 at 3:46
    
Thanks for this detailed response. I'm still unpacking it and noticing syntax nuance as I go (using vs typedef, for example). I think your alternate syntax is ok, it simply trades Ptr<Class> for Class::ptr which I think is ok. I also think that if I adopt the boilerplated Pointerable, I would be able to create an alternate version wrapped around boost::intrusive_ptr where necessary and use the same Ptr<Class> syntax. –  G B Jul 19 '13 at 17:35
    
Yep, the reason why you'd use Pointerable would be to have a SharedPointerable and IntrusivePointerable, with a factory that takes a type and produces the smart pointer. –  Yakk Jul 19 '13 at 17:47
    
For continuity, I'll mention that I ran into some circular reference with the solution proposed by @Yakk, which led me to ask this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/17800256/… Which led to a similar syntax to what you've suggested, but without inheriting from the trait class. –  G B Jul 23 '13 at 21:43
1  
@GB There is a reason why my base classes had a template alias and not a type alias. using ptr = std::shared_ptr<T> is very different than template<typename T> using ptr = std::shared_ptr<T> -- one is a circular dependency, the other is not. :) –  Yakk Jul 23 '13 at 22:17

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