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I have a roster of employees, and I need to know at what department they are in most often. It is trivial to tabulate employee ID against department name, but it is trickier to return the department name, rather than the number of roster counts, from the frequency table. A simple example below (column names = departments, row names = employee ids).

DF <- matrix(sample(1:9,9),ncol=3,nrow=3)
DF <- as.data.frame.matrix(DF)
> DF
  V1 V2 V3
1  2  7  9
2  8  3  6
3  1  5  4

Now how do I get

> DF2
  RE
1 V3
2 V1
3 V2
share|improve this question
    
how big is your actual data? – Arun Jul 18 '13 at 23:51
    
@Arun > dim(test) [1] 26746 18 – dmvianna Jul 18 '13 at 23:57
up vote 10 down vote accepted

One option using your data (for future reference, use set.seed() to make examples using sample reproducible):

DF <- data.frame(V1=c(2,8,1),V2=c(7,3,5),V3=c(9,6,4))

colnames(DF)[apply(DF,1,which.max)]
[1] "V3" "V1" "V2"

A faster solution than using apply might be max.col:

colnames(DF)[max.col(DF,ties.method="first")]
#[1] "V3" "V1" "V2"

...where ties.method can be any of "random" "first" or "last"

This of course causes issues if you happen to have two columns which are equal to the maximum. I'm not sure what you want to do in that instance as you will have more than one result for some rows. E.g.:

DF <- data.frame(V1=c(2,8,1),V2=c(7,3,5),V3=c(7,6,4))
apply(DF,1,function(x) which(x==max(x)))

[[1]]
V2 V3 
 2  3 

[[2]]
V1 
 1 

[[3]]
V2 
 2 
share|improve this answer
    
If I have two equal columns I usually just pick the first. These are border cases which do not upset my statistical analysis. – dmvianna Jul 18 '13 at 23:59
    
@dmvianna - using which.max will be fine then. – thelatemail Jul 19 '13 at 0:03
    
I'm assuming the order is preserved, so I can create a new column with this vector that will align correctly to the employees IDs. Is that correct? – dmvianna Jul 19 '13 at 0:05
    
apply converts the data.frame to matrix internally. You may not see a performance difference on these dimensions though. – Arun Jul 19 '13 at 0:07
    
@dmvianna - yep, should do. apply(x,1,function) will just go through each row in turn starting at 1 and finishing at nrow(x). – thelatemail Jul 19 '13 at 0:07

If you're interested in a data.table solution, here's one. It's a bit tricky since you prefer to get the id for the first maximum. It's much easier if you'd rather want the last maximum. Nevertheless, it's not that complicated and it's fast!

Here I've generated data of your dimensions (26746 * 18).

Data

set.seed(45)
DF <- data.frame(matrix(sample(10, 26746*18, TRUE), ncol=18))

data.table answer:

require(data.table)
DT <- data.table(value=unlist(DF, use.names=FALSE), 
            colid = 1:nrow(DF), rowid = rep(names(DF), each=nrow(DF)))
setkey(DT, colid, value)
t1 <- DT[J(unique(colid), DT[J(unique(colid)), value, mult="last"]), rowid, mult="first"]

Benchmarking:

# data.table solution
system.time({
DT <- data.table(value=unlist(DF, use.names=FALSE), 
            colid = 1:nrow(DF), rowid = rep(names(DF), each=nrow(DF)))
setkey(DT, colid, value)
t1 <- DT[J(unique(colid), DT[J(unique(colid)), value, mult="last"]), rowid, mult="first"]
})
#   user  system elapsed 
#  0.174   0.029   0.227 

# apply solution from @thelatemail
system.time(t2 <- colnames(DF)[apply(DF,1,which.max)])
#   user  system elapsed 
#  2.322   0.036   2.602 

identical(t1, t2)
# [1] TRUE

It's about 11 times faster on data of these dimensions, and data.table scales pretty well too.


Edit: if any of the max ids is okay, then:

DT <- data.table(value=unlist(DF, use.names=FALSE), 
            colid = 1:nrow(DF), rowid = rep(names(DF), each=nrow(DF)))
setkey(DT, colid, value)
t1 <- DT[J(unique(colid)), rowid, mult="last"]
share|improve this answer
    
I actually dont' care if it is the first or last maximum. I'm going for simplicity first, but I'm sure a data.table solution will come handy in the future, thanks! – dmvianna Jul 19 '13 at 0:48
    
Sure, I know your question is not particular of performance and that's why I was reluctant at first to write this answer. But then, someone else may be interested. I work with huge data and have gotten used to tweaking for speed rather than simplicity. I understand that's not everyone's concern. – Arun Jul 19 '13 at 1:15

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