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I'm reading about anonymous classes in java and it says you can access the methods of the enclosing class, but not the local variables. Why is it like this? I'm talking about this:

EDIT: The older example was incorrect not reflecting what I meant. This should be a better example according with what its being written here in the section "Accessing members of enclosing class" http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/localclasses.html.

public class MyClass {
    public interface SomeInterface{
        public void someOtherMethod();
    }

    public void someMethod(int someLocalVar) {
        SomeInterface myClass = new SomeInterface(){
            public void someOtherMethod(){
                someLocalVar = 0; // This must be final to work
            }
        }
    }
}

So what problem is this restriction solving?

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migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Jul 19 '13 at 1:16

This question came from our site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development.

marked as duplicate by gnat, skuntsel, loxxy, Dirk, Steve P. Jul 20 '13 at 7:39

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3  
Questions about "why" someone made a technical decision are hard and usually impossible to answer by anyone except the person who made the technical decision. –  Jimmy Hoffa Jul 16 '13 at 19:37
4  
Check this link: pastebin.com/MabKDJjv Here is example where I can access mSomeVar from anonymous class (check anotherTest()). And please explain, what does not work in your case? –  Rafael Osipov Jul 18 '13 at 6:37
1  
You're right. The code I've written as example from what I was reading was incorrect. I'll fix that. –  Adrián Pérez Jul 19 '13 at 16:21
1  
@AdriánPérez: However, now the sentence "So why is it required to make the call to a method?" doesn't make sense. There is no call to any method. –  user102008 Jul 19 '13 at 19:00
1  
@user102008 You know what?, when I was writing this the first time it did make sense someway, because I was trying to get rid of the error and then I started to read that article from Oracle and I did something by creating a method, I don't remember now if it was in the enclosing class or the inner/anonymous class but it worked. Or may be that was another error I was facing and I mixed the two and messed up, like with the other example code I wrote :/ I'm removing that sentence now, and buying some more caffeine :D –  Adrián Pérez Jul 19 '13 at 21:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

This comes from early version Java Inner Classes Specification.

Official specification URL, referred eg from VM spec 2.14 is gone for link rot: http://java.sun.com/products/jdk/1.1/docs/guide/innerclasses/spec/innerclasses.doc.html

January 17, 1999 snapshot can be obtained at wayback machine though, respective spec section is References to local variables.

The way how things are supposed to work, is described as follows (I marked most relevant statement bold):

A class definition which is local to a block may access local variables. This complicates the compiler's job. Here is the previous example of a local class:

    Enumeration myEnumerate(final Object array[]) {
        class E implements Enumeration {
            int count = 0;
            public boolean hasMoreElements()
                { return count < array.length; }
            public Object nextElement() {
                { return array[count++]; }
        }
        return new E();
    }

In order to make a local variable visible to a method of the inner class, the compiler must copy the variable's value into a place where the inner class can access it. References to the same variable may use different code sequences in different places, as long as the same value is produced everywhere, so that the name consistently appears to refer to the same variable in all parts of its scope.

By convention, a local variable like array is copied into a private field val$array of the inner class. (Because array is final, such copies never contain inconsistent values.) ...

You see, language designers wanted value of copied local variable to be "consistent" every time such a copy is created. Their motivation was most likely that developers would need not worry to look outside of the copy of inner class to check whether it has been changed out there:

Enumeration myEnumerate(Object array[], int copy) { // array not final, let's see...
    for (int i = 0, i < 2; i++ ) { // loop to have several copies
        class E implements Enumeration {
            int count = 0;
            public boolean hasMoreElements()
                { return count < array.length; }
            public Object nextElement() {
                { return array[count++]; }
        } // we hope to be done with E... oh no 

        array = null; // not final => can change

        if (i == copy) {
            return new E(); // we need to look outside of E
            // to figure value of array it uses
        }
    }
    return null;
}

Note although spec example uses named class, same reasoning applies to anonymous classes:

// ...
    for (int i = 0, i < 2; i++ ) { // loop to have several copies
        if (i == copy) {
            return new Enumeration() {
                int count = 0;
                public boolean hasMoreElements()
                    { return count < array.length; }
                public Object nextElement() {
                    { return array[count++]; }
            } // we hope to be done... oh no
        }

        array = null; // not final => can change
    }
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2  
Thank you very much @gnat. I see now the purpose of it. –  Adrián Pérez Jul 16 '13 at 20:29
1  
You are answering a question that does not match the OP's code. In the OP's code, he's showing an instance variable, which definitely can be accessed and modified from the inner class. –  user102008 Jul 18 '13 at 20:41
    
@user102008 that's a good observation, thanks! Code in question indeed contradicts to what is written in original title: "Why an anonymous class can't access local variables but local members of it's enclosing class?" I usually prefer questions like that to be closed to be sorted out through editing. Unfortunately I am out of close votes today, will flag for mod attention to help in that –  gnat Jul 18 '13 at 21:16
1  
@gnat I misunderstood what you meant by "could be changed." I thought you meant that the copying was so that the referenced object couldn't be changed (e.g. elements in an array being set), which of course can still happen. –  yshavit Jul 19 '13 at 4:47
1  
Sorry guys, I see I messed all with the code example. Seems like magic most of you understood me at first :) –  Adrián Pérez Jul 19 '13 at 16:43

Inner classes can access final variables of enclosing classes.


Here's an interesting memo:

Actually, the prototype implementation did allow non-final variables to be referenced from within inner classes. There was an outcry from users, complaining that they did not want this! The reason was interesting: in order to support such variables, it was necessary to heap-allocate them, and (at that time, at least) the average Java programmer was still pretty skittish about heap allocation and garbage collection and all that. They disapproved of the language performing heap allocation "under the table" when there was no occurrence of the "new" keyword in sight.

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Very interesting indeed! So, the reason to avoid non-final variables to be referenced from within inner classes may not be just because the value consistency, but because users didn't like the compiler make those variables to be heap allocated. Now I think it may be desirable. Hope they change their minds! –  Adrián Pérez Jul 16 '13 at 20:39
1  
Inner classes can access any instance variable in the enclosing class, and the OP's code is showing an instance variable. –  user102008 Jul 18 '13 at 20:41

An anonymous class object can have a lifetime that lasts longer than the method that created it, but it cannot last longer than the lifetime of the parent object.

Consider the following

public void runSomething() {
   int a = 5;
   new Thread(new Runnable() {
      public void run() {
         a = 10;
      }
   }
}

Which 'a' variable is the Runnable going to modify. Cannot change the one local to the method, because the method is no longer on the stack.

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your example is not convincing, sorry. It raises a question, why compiler can't create a copy of a behind the scene and use it in that Runnable? Skipping a boilerplate one would do in Java, like int a=5; final int b=a; then passing that b-copy into AIC. Note some other languages do just that. And some other languages go even further, they allow to capture a straight from the method (search web for something like "call by name" if you're interested) –  gnat Jul 16 '13 at 18:01
1  
@gnat more perspicuously in a language with GC, all it needs to do is ensure that ref is held and counted by the GC; this is presumably what .NET and most other languages with closures do. The method, even the parent class can all go out of scope, but so long as a reference is held to one of the variables, it's memory shouldn't get GC'd –  Jimmy Hoffa Jul 16 '13 at 18:19
1  
Also, when an object on the heap references a value type it's not referencing the stack, it's interning that value type's value directly in itself on the heap. Thus why it's a value type not a reference type. The closure there on the heap should start with a value for a of 5 in its heap space, and when executed that will go on the stack, and its stack version of a will get changed to 10. (This is a bit presumptuous of me, I don't know if Java even has value types but since you refer to a being on the stack I'm guessing it does) –  Jimmy Hoffa Jul 16 '13 at 18:22
    
This answer works for me. The point of getting rid of "final" is so we can get values back easily from a Runnable, but making the Runnable's a a separate copy defeats that, and is a bit confusing as well. Keeping the two a's the same is better, but now we've got a local field that's not thread safe, which is just a bit scary. –  RalphChapin Jul 17 '13 at 19:45

As Rafael Osipov said in the comments, you definitely can access mSomeVar, an instance variable of the enclosing class, from the anonymous class. So your question doesn't make sense.

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as far as I can tell, this no longer applies to revised code. There's no mSomeVar anymore –  gnat Jul 19 '13 at 16:51

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