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In java i was trying to write producer and consumer implementation using simple wait and notifyAll() methods using below code. It runs for couple of seconds and hangs later. Any thought how to resolve this.

import java.util.ArrayDeque;
import java.util.Queue;

public class Prod_consumer {
    static Queue<String> q = new ArrayDeque(10);

    static class Producer implements Runnable {
        public void run() {
            while (true) {
                if (q.size() == 10) {
                    synchronized (q) {
                        try {
                            System.out.println("Q is full so waiting");
                            q.wait();
                        } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
                            ex.printStackTrace();
                        }
                    }
                }
                synchronized (q) {
                    String st = System.currentTimeMillis() + "";
                    q.add(st);
                    q.notifyAll();
                }
            }
        }

    }

    static class Consumer implements Runnable {
        public void run() {
            while (true) {
                if (q.isEmpty()) {
                    synchronized(q) {
                        try {
                            System.out.println("Q is empty so waiting ");
                            q.wait();
                        }catch(InterruptedException ie) {
                            ie.printStackTrace();
                        }
                    }
                }
                synchronized(q) {
                    System.out.println(q.remove());
                    q.notifyAll();
                }

            }

        }
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        Thread consumer = new Thread(new Consumer());
        Thread consumer2 = new Thread(new Consumer());
        Thread producer = new Thread(new Producer());

        producer.start();
        consumer.start();
        consumer2.start();

    }

}
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your Producer code seems suspicious. You want to wait until the queue size is below 10 and then add the next element. However, with the current logic you wait until a notify, regardless of the reason, don't check whether the queue is over capacity, and then release the lock on the queue. You then re-lock the queue and add the item (regardless of whether another thread may have put something into the queue).

I suggest this code:

static class Producer implements Runnable {
    public void run() {
        while (true) {
            synchronized (q) {
                if (q.size() < 10) {
                    String st = System.currentTimeMillis() + "";
                    q.add(st);
                    q.notifyAll();
                } else {
                    try {
                        System.out.println("Q is full so waiting");
                        q.wait();
                    } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
                        ex.printStackTrace();
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

You have a similar problem with the Consumer class. I suggest this:

static class Consumer implements Runnable {
    public void run() {
        while (true) {
            synchronized (q) {
                if (q.isEmpty()) {
                    try {
                        System.out.println("Q is empty so waiting ");
                        q.wait();
                    }catch(InterruptedException ie) {
                        ie.printStackTrace();
                    }
                } else {
                    System.out.println(q.remove());
                    q.notifyAll();
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

Note that in both cases, the lock is maintained between the code that checks whether it is okay to proceed and the actual business of the method.

share|improve this answer
    
One minor issue I want to raise. Normally when a thread goes to wait, it will give up the corresponding monitor it acquired until someone notify. Once it wakes up from wait() that thread will already have the monitor acquired. However your approach is giving up that acquired monitor (by leaving the sync block) and acquire again, which still works (from what I can recognize) but adding extra unnecessary burden. –  Adrian Shum Jul 22 '13 at 1:39
    
@AdrianShum - You're right to note the issue. If there were several producer or consumer threads, leaving the synchronized block would give each of them a chance to use the queue a bit. If the while block were brought inside the synchronized block, then once a producer or consumer acquired the monitor, it would hold it until the queue was at capacity or emptied (as applicable). If that's the desired behavior, then reversing the nesting order would be appropriate. –  Ted Hopp Jul 22 '13 at 2:28
    
even moving the loop in sync block, it is not going to "hold the monitor until the queue was at capacity or emptied". Once it goes to wait(), the monitor is released, and other threads are still possible to "use the queue". The only difference is the overhead to release and reacquire the monitor. –  Adrian Shum Jul 22 '13 at 2:33
    
@AdrianShum - with the loop inside the sync block, a consumer won't go into wait until the queue is empty, and a producer won't go into wait until it is full. –  Ted Hopp Jul 22 '13 at 2:54
    
oh I see what you mean, in fact the thing I am talking is different :) maybe let me update my answer to include that as it is hard to include code in comment :) –  Adrian Shum Jul 22 '13 at 3:09

Every operation on the shared memory should be guarded against multuthreaded access. Current implementation has a deadlock because of unsychronized state of queue checking. You should be able to easily model that code in Promela to get the deadlock scenario. Nevertheless you should be aware that condition_variables (synchronized section) has no counting semantic, so if the thread was preemption before reaching the waiting state, and other one call the notifyAll() function in the meanwhile, that will not apply to preemtioned thread after it get the control back. The solution is quite simple:

...
while (true)
{
    synchronized (q)
    {
        if (q.size() == 10)
...
while (true)
{
    synchronized(q)
    {
        if (q.isEmpty())
...
share|improve this answer

I can see there is lots of problem in your current implementation. However, what have you investigated and where dead lock you are concerning is caused? I believe this should be something you have done.

One of the biggest problems is the scope of synchronization is simply wrong, and it is causing lots of race condition.

Use your Consumer logic as an example, it is possible that there is only 1 element in the queue. Both consumer thread hits if (q.isEmpty()) { and both think there are things for it to get from the queue. Then both will keep going and run q.remove(), which is fine for the first thread but exception will be thrown for the next.

Another example of race condition is, it is possible that consumer checked the queue is empty, but just before it start the sync block, producer put 10 items in the queue which makes it full, then consumer enter the sync block to wait(). As the notifyAll() is done before and the consumer will lose the previous notifyAll(), and because the queue is now full and producer thread will not put any new item to the queue as it keep on waiting the queue to be consumed by someone. Boom, deadlock

There are other problem in your code too (e.g. not wrapping wait() in a loop).

I strong suggest you Google for some example of producer-consumer queue (I believe there are tons) and try to understand what is the right way to do.


For replying comments in @TedHopp's comment:

@TedHopp's way will work but it is unnecessary releasing and reacquiring the monitor of queue.

Normally it should be something looks like:

static class Producer implements Runnable {
    public void run() {
        while (true) {  // keep on adding item
            String st = "" + System.currentTimeMillis(); // prepare the item
            synchronized (q) {
                while (q.size() >= 10) {  // keep on waiting when the queue is full
                    try {
                        System.out.println("Q is full so waiting");
                        q.wait();
                    } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
                        ex.printStackTrace();
                        // should be properly handled by rethrowing etc.
                    }
                }
                q.add(st);  // add item to queue as it is not full at this moment
                q.notifyAll();
            }
        }
    }
}

Moreover, normally we would want to create a producer-consumer-queue class, while the "add" method of such pc-queue will contain the logic within the above sync block.

The above way do not need extra release/reacquisition of the monitor, and looks closer to what should be implemented in a pc-queue.

share|improve this answer

You should wrap any code that touches the queue in synchronized. For example

if (q.size() == 10) {
    synchronized (q) {

the queue size could change after the if statement is evaluated. Better to switch the order.

You have the same problem in your Consumer

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