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In the MVC pattern I see a distinction between the classes that comprise the data model and the instances of these classes that drive the system. My team respectfully disagrees with me, and I would like to have some clarification.

I have an Employee class that is the only class in the model. The controller has one instance of the class, and that instance drives the view.

I would call the one instance of the Employee class that is owned by the controller "the model", and I would call any other instance of the Employee class that does not drive the system "not the model".

Why I make this distinction is because my team argues that the view shouldn't create the model. I agree, but I think the view should be able to create instances of the Employee class to pass to the controller.

For example if I had a method setCoworker(employee : Employee) in the controller, I think it would be perfectly okay for the view to create a new instance of Employee and pass that to the controller.

What do the MVC pattern best practices dictate? Should I not be creating instances from the view?

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closed as too broad by tereško, Ocramius, RAS, Roman C, Siddharth Jul 19 '13 at 11:12

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3 Answers 3

It depends a little on which MVC pattern you're following (there's a lot of flavors). In general, though, the View's only responsibilities should be to translate from human input into calls to the Controller, and from whatever data state the Model holds into the output to the human.

So I have to agree with your team. You might have a button OnClick handler or the like in the view which then calls controller.BuildANewModel(), but you wouldn't have the view instantiate the new model on it's own.

That said, last time I checked, the Gang of Four had hung up their baseball bats and tire irons and weren't in the business of laying the smack-down on folks who don't follow the patterns to the letter, so whatever works for you. . . :)

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I appreciate your thoughts. But what if BuildANewModel() requires a lot of parameters that come directly from human input (i.e. the view)? We could pass all the arguments into the function, but that becomes unwieldy to manage, and if we create a separate object that has all the parameters, we would essentially be repeating a class that is already in the model.. What do you think? –  Samuel Jul 19 '13 at 2:03
    
That's usually defined in the controller's interface, either as parameters or as a data object of some kind. Like I said, nobody's going to break your kneecaps over using the Model for that data object, but it is not in accordance with the pattern, which is what your question was about. –  Paul Jul 19 '13 at 2:28
    
I kind of like the idea of a data object exposed by the controller. Something like EmployeeCreationArgs. This may be valuable if there are parts of the Employee class that the view doesn't or shouldn't be concerned with. Thanks for your input :) –  Samuel Jul 19 '13 at 2:55

Views should not be passing anything to the controllers. Controllers should not be passing anything to the views. And model layer should not be returning anything to the controllers. Here is how information flow should be implemented in MVC:

enter image description here

Source: wikipedia

Also, model is a layer. Not a class or object. A layer that contains multitude of structures, each with a different responsibility. What you call Employee is not the model (or even "a model"). Instead it is simply one of many domain objects.

Neither your views nor your controllers should have any direct access to the domain objects. Instead they should interact with model layer through service layer, that contains the "application logic" (interaction between domain and storage structures) within the model layer.

Those would be my two cents on the subject, but I will be flagging this as "too broad" since one could write a book (and some - have) on the subject of MVC implementation.

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Just a note to help people avoid confusion - this here is the classical MVC. E.g Backbone.js uses "View" in much broader sense, where such "View" does pass all user interaction to other components. –  Dmitri Zaitsev Aug 29 '13 at 7:38
    
@DmitriZaitsev how is Backbone related to the subject? –  tereško Aug 29 '13 at 13:21
    
On the pedantic side I understand you. But people often mean by MVC all sorts of flavours. Backbone is just an example to illustrate the point about other flavours, that may or may not be relevant for a confused reader, but then another library or framework likely will. –  Dmitri Zaitsev Aug 29 '13 at 13:53

I'd agree with your team:

to limit the dependencies the view should not even be aware of the controller and its internal implementation, so it won't be able to pass created employees to the controller.
There should be just an notification mechanism — delegation or some other loose coupling mechanism — where the view informs the controller, that it should create a new employee, or differential phrased: the view would inform the controller of some certain input or event and the controller would decide to create a new employee.
In your solution view and controller would be tightly coupled together that it actually could be seen as on component: the MVC pattern would be destroyed.


MVC in short: Model holds the data, controller has the logic, view interacts with the user. the only components that knows both other is the controller. the model know nothing about the view or the controller, the view knows nothing about the model and is only coupled very loosely with the controller. just informing it about input and a-like. you can certainly create other constructs, but that isnt MVC anymore. and your question was about MVC.

This describes the MVC Pattern in Cocoa, the vocabulary might be unfamiliar, but more or less MVC should look like this. Green indicates the knowledge of controller about Model and View, while yellow show different loose-coupling mechanisms. That might be called different in different languages and frameworks.

MVC

found here: What should own the model in an MVC pattern?

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Method invocation doesn't mean that the view is coupled to the internal implementation of the controller. You can use an interface to abstract the behavior of the controller that is exposed to the view. The view isn't coupled to any specific implementation of the interface. This doesn't answer my specific questions about the model. –  Samuel Jul 19 '13 at 2:05
    
sure, an interface would be a good solution. but if the view would becom a creator of new objects, it would fulfill tasks that belongs to the controller. so it would contain code that the controller would depend on: the controller would be scattered over several objects. –  vikingosegundo Jul 19 '13 at 2:08
    
Can you read my first comment on Paul's post in regards to passing parameters? What's your opinion about that? –  Samuel Jul 19 '13 at 2:09
    
you could also create a factory, independent from your controller and the view. but still I'd say the view should only talk to the controller and should create nothing. –  vikingosegundo Jul 19 '13 at 2:11
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sorry, I have to say: you should invest less time in justifying your idea of a model-creating view and a degenerated controller and listen to your team. MVC in short: Model holds the data, controller has the logic, view interacts with the user. the only components that knows both other is the controller. the model know nothing about the view or the controller, the view knows nothing about the model and is only coupled very loosely with the controller. just informing it about input and a-like. you can certainly create other constructs, but that isnt MVC anymore. and your question was about MVC. –  vikingosegundo Jul 19 '13 at 2:57

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