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How to cast from hexadecimal to string in C?

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Elaborate your question and you get elaborated answers –  jitter Nov 20 '09 at 23:07
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There is no "hexadecimal" type in C. –  Artelius Nov 20 '09 at 23:15
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It is a real question, a beginner just got the terminology slightly wrong - can we be a bit more helpful please? –  Martin Beckett Nov 20 '09 at 23:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You cannot simply 'cast', you will need to use sprintf to do the convertion:

unsigned int hex = 0xABC123FF;
char hexString[256];
sprintf(hexString, "0x%08X", hex);

If you want to 'cast' it to string in order to print it, you can use printf directly:

unsigned int hex = 0xABC123FF;
printf("0x%08X", hex);
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How about snprintf? :-) –  James McNellis Nov 20 '09 at 23:10
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It's in the C99 standard library. –  James McNellis Nov 20 '09 at 23:13
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MSVC has a version called _snprintf. –  Greg Hewgill Nov 20 '09 at 23:19
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My comments were not meant for the OP, but rather for people who might come across this page in the future and believe that sprintf or _snprintf is a good, safe idea. –  Greg Hewgill Nov 20 '09 at 23:36
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sprintf is perfectly safe when used the way LiraNuna did. An upper bound on the number of digits produced by %x can be determined from the range of the input number. –  caf Nov 21 '09 at 1:22

You cannot cast from a number to a string in C. You'll have to call a function for that purpose.

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Just stumbled over this old thread. Who says one cannot cast hex to string? That's a lie, I can:

unsigned int hex = 0xABC123FF;
char *str = (char*)&hex;

Okay it doesn't make sense printing it as C string (zero terminated), but I casted it ;)

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