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I am running Python 2.6. I have the following example where I am trying to concatenate the date and time string columns from a csv file. Based on the dtype I set (None vs object), I am seeing some differences in behavior that I cannot explained, see Question 1 and 2 at the end of the post. The exception returned is not too descriptive, and the dtype documentation doesn't mention any specific behavior to expect when dtype is set to object.

Here is the snippet:

#! /usr/bin/python

import numpy as np

# simulate a csv file
from StringIO import StringIO
data = StringIO("""
Title
Date,Time,Speed
,,(m/s)
2012-04-01,00:10, 85
2012-04-02,00:20, 86
2012-04-03,00:30, 87
""".strip())


# (Fail) case 1: dtype=None splicing a column fails

next(data)                                                      # eat away the title line
header = [item.strip() for item in next(data).split(',')]       # get the headers
arr1 = np.genfromtxt(data, dtype=None, delimiter=',',skiprows=1)# skiprows=1 for the row with units
arr1.dtype.names = header                                       # assign the header to names
                                                                # so we can do y=arr['Speed']
y1 = arr1['Speed']  

# Q1 IndexError: invalid index
#a1 = arr1[:,0] 
#print a1
# EDIT1: 
print "arr1.shape " 
print arr1.shape # (3,)

# Fails as expected TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for +: 'numpy.ndarray' and 'numpy.ndarray'
# z1 = arr1['Date'] + arr1['Time'] 
# This can be workaround by specifying dtype=object, which leads to case 2

data.seek(0)        # resets

# (Fail) case 2: dtype=object assign header fails
next(data)                                                          # eat away the title line
header = [item.strip() for item in next(data).split(',')]           # get the headers
arr2 = np.genfromtxt(data, dtype=object, delimiter=',',skiprows=1)  # skiprows=1 for the row with units

# Q2 ValueError: there are no fields define
#arr2.dtype.names = header # assign the header to names. so we can use it to do indexing
                         # ie y=arr['Speed']
# y2 = arr['Date'] + arr['Time']    # column headings were assigned previously by arr.dtype.names = header

data.seek(0)        # resets

# (Good) case 3: dtype=object but don't assign headers
next(data)                                                          # eat away the title line
header = [item.strip() for item in next(data).split(',')]           # get the headers
arr3 = np.genfromtxt(data, dtype=object, delimiter=',',skiprows=1)  # skiprows=1 for the row with units
y3 = arr3[:,0] + arr3[:,1]                                          # slice the columns
print y3

# case 4: dtype=None, all data are ints, array dimension 2-D

# simulate a csv file
from StringIO import StringIO
data2 = StringIO("""
Title
Date,Time,Speed
,,(m/s)
45,46,85
12,13,86
50,46,87
""".strip())

next(data2)                                                      # eat away the title line
header = [item.strip() for item in next(data2).split(',')]       # get the headers
arr4 = np.genfromtxt(data2, dtype=None, delimiter=',',skiprows=1)# skiprows=1 for the row with units
#arr4.dtype.names = header # Value error
print "arr4.shape " 
print arr4.shape # (3,3)

data2.seek(0)        # resets

Question 1: At comment Q1, why can I not slice a column, when dtype=None? This could be avoided by a) arr1=np-genfromtxt... was initialized with dtype=object like case 3, b) arr1.dtype.names=... wascommented out to avoid the Value error in case 2

Question 2: At comment Q2, why can I not set the dtype.names when dtype=object?

EDIT1:

Added a case 4 that shows when the dimension of the array would be 2-D if the values in the simulated csv files are all ints instead. One can slice the column, but assigning the dtype.names would still fail.

Update the term 'splice' to 'slice'.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Question 1

This is indexing, not 'splicing', and you can't index into the columns of data for exactly the same reason I explained to you before in my answer to Question 7 here. Look at arr1.shape - it is (3,), i.e. arr1 is 1D, not 2D. There are no columns for you to index into.

Now look at the shape of arr2 - you'll see that it's (3,3). Why is this? If you do specify dtype=desired_type, np.genfromtxt will treat every delimited part of your input string the same (i.e. as desired_type), and it will give you an ordinary, non-structured numpy array back.

I'm not quite sure what you wanted to do with this line:

z1 = arr1['Date'] + arr1['Time'] 

Did you mean to concatenate the date and time strings together like this: '2012-04-01 00:10'? You could do it like this:

z1 = [d + ' ' + t for d,t in zip(arr1['Date'],arr1['Time'])]

It depends what you want to do with the output (this will give you a list of strings, not a numpy array).

I should point out that, as of version 1.7, Numpy has core array types that support datetime functionality. This would allow you to do much more useful things like computing time deltas etc.

dts = np.array(z1,dtype=np.datetime64)

Edit: If you want to plot timeseries data, you can use matplotlib.dates.strpdate2num to convert your strings to matplotlib datenums, then use plot_date():

from matplotlib import dates
from matplotlib import pyplot as pp

# convert date and time strings to matplotlib datenums
dtconv = dates.strpdate2num('%Y-%m-%d%H:%M')
datenums = [dtconv(d+t) for d,t in zip(arr1['Date'],arr1['Time'])]

# use plot_date to plot timeseries
pp.plot_date(datenums,arr1['Speed'],'-ob')

You should also take a look at Pandas, which has some nice tools for visualising timeseries data.

Question 2

You can't set the names of arr2 because it is not a structured array (see above).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for pointing out the limitation of names assignment with structured array. I noticed this limitation testing, but it wasn't clear to me from the doc hence the post. 1) I printed arr1.shape, and it was (3,3) instead of (3,) that you mentioned. 2) For z1 = arr1['Date'] + arr1['Time'] I wanted to concatenate the strings from the column and return a numpy array column that I can use in plotting a time series graph. 3) FYI - I believe from reading the index page of ndarray docs.python.org/2/library/functions.html#zip, they do refer to the term Basic Slicing as what I was trying to do. –  frank Jul 23 '13 at 1:37
    
1) I don't think so - your exact code copy-pasted into numpy v1.7.1 gives me arr1.shape == (3,). Are you sure you've not mixed up your variable names? 2) See my updates. 3) OK, but it's slicing, not 'splicing'. I don't mean to sound condescending, but it does help people to understand what you're asking about. –  ali_m Jul 23 '13 at 10:05
    
1) Sorry, I changed my test case 1 to use dtype=object, it's indeed (3,). I have added a case 4 which has all the fields as int in the input data with dtype=None, the dimension of the array is (3,3). However, assigning the dtype.names would still fail simiilar to case 2. I was browsing docs for "non-structured numpy array" to see if this falls in that case, but I couldn't find any reference on that term in docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/user/basics.rec.html. 2) Thanks I have looked into plot_date 3) Yes, I should use the correct terminology and said slicing, updated the OP. Thank you. –  frank Jul 25 '13 at 4:01

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