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The author said in his book,in doing Document Order explanation that:

In other words, document order simply refers to the order in which nodes appear in an XML document. There's no question about the order when you're dealing with elements that enclose other elements, for example, but when you're dealing with elements on the same level—sibling elements—document order specifies that they should be ordered as they were in the original XML document.

Here's one more thing to know about document order—attribute nodes are not in any special order, even in document order.

Now my questions are -

  • Why do the order of attributes not needed ?

  • "There's no question about the order when you're dealing with elements that enclose other elements," - why ?

  • -
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To elaborate on the previous answer and respond to the first comment, I think it all revolves around hierarchies. If an element contains other elements, the order is obvious because there is a hierarchy.

In the following example, a precedes b in document order.

<a>
  <b/>
</a>

In the following example, b and c are siblings (both on the same level; children of a). It's not quite as obvious what the document order is for the siblings, but c precedes b in document order.

<a>
  <c/>
  <b/>
</a>

This can get confusing if the structure is complex. For example, in the following document d precedes b in document order even though d is further down the hierarchical tree (it is a child of b's sibling c).

<a>
  <c>
    <d/>
  </c>
  <b/>
</a>

The order of attributes is not needed because they aren't representing a hierarchy. They are just describing/further defining the element. Think meta-data. The only document ordering that they have really is that an elements attributes precede any of that elements child elements. The relative order of the attributes are implementation-dependent.

For example, if you use the XPath /*/@*[1] on the following document:

<foo b="x" a="x"/>

you could either get the a attribute or the b attribute depending on how the implementation orders the attributes.

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I am having some little conceptual issues like this. Now you answered it awesomely. May I email you those personally,if you allow? Not very often,I just started xpath. So facing some problem,while reading books. –  Arup Rakshit Jul 19 '13 at 20:04
    
@Priti - You're more than welcome to email me. My email is in my profile. I'm not always quick to respond though, so you should still consider stackoverflow a top resource. Also, if my answer is sufficient, please consider accepting it by clicking the checkmark next to it. Thanks! –  Daniel Haley Jul 19 '13 at 20:16
    
@Priti - Email sent –  Daniel Haley Jul 19 '13 at 22:57

"There's no question about the order when you're dealing with elements that enclose other elements," - why ?

Well, there clearly is a question, because you've just asked it. It's just that the author, for some reason, thought the answer was obvious. The answer is that if A is an ancestor of B, then A precedes B in document order.

Why do the order of attributes not needed ?

It's a design principle in XML that you shouldn't be using attributes if order is significant. That relates to the semantics of object modelling: attributes represent properties of an object that are independent and orthogonal. Like adjectives: saying something is a big red box means the same as saying it is a red big box. If not (as in "great white shark"), then the adjectives are not truly attributive qualifiers of the noun, and shouldn't be modelled in XML as attributes.

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still I didn't catch the points of the author.. :( Once he is saying There's no question about the order when you're dealing with elements that enclose other elements, and on the other hand he is saying when you're dealing with elements on the same level—sibling elements—document order specifies that they should be ordered as they were in the original XML document. –  Arup Rakshit Jul 19 '13 at 8:49
1  
I'm not sure what part of that you don't understand. Try a different book. –  Michael Kay Jul 19 '13 at 11:31
    
the line I mentioned in the comment,is conflicting to me.. thus I got confused. –  Arup Rakshit Jul 19 '13 at 11:34

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