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I am facing a problem with a Perl regex. On an img element, I want to match the src attribute with a value starting with /file?id, and with any class and alt attribute. I want to ignore the rel attribute which sometimes exist and sometimes not exist like below:

<img rel="lightbox[45451]" src="/file?id=13166" class="bbc_img" alt="myimagess.jpg">    

<img  src="/file?id=13166" class="bbc_img" alt="myimagess.jpg">

My question is how to handle the optional rel attribute.

I am trying this for the rel attribute match:

(?!\s+(rel)="([^"]+)")

It works when there is no rel attribute but fails when the img has a rel attribute.

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7  
Don't do that, use a real HTML parser instead. –  Quentin Jul 19 '13 at 7:49
1  
@Quentin using a regex to match a known, limited subset of HTML/XML can be fine, depending on the desired level of robustness vs. complexity & performance. Aka it's OK to break the rules when you know why and what the consequences are. –  instanceof me Jul 19 '13 at 8:43
1  
@January: Not really. Using a ready-built parser is almost always quicker and less dirty than using regular expressions. And HTML is a poor target for regular expressions, as evinced by this very question, and will mislead the learner. –  Borodin Jul 19 '13 at 8:54
1  
@January: I wholeheartedly disagree. A regex cannot possibly be "more durable" than a parser written for the domain. In particular, the task is so complex that it needs very comprehensive testing, and can never be confirmed as correct. Learning a language by writing code for data it wasn't intended to process cannot be a good way to go. HTML is not a regular language, and you can never write a complete general HTML-processing solution using regular expressions. You may as well advocate writing client-side scripts in Logo. –  Borodin Jul 19 '13 at 9:23
1  
@January: No. Using a regular expression to process an irregular language is a bad idea. Please don't evangelise your wrong-headedness. –  Borodin Jul 19 '13 at 9:59

3 Answers 3

Web::Query wins!

use Web::Query 'wq';
my $html = <<'';
<html>
<img rel="lightbox[45451]" src="/file?id=13166" class="bbc_img" alt="myimagess1.jpg">
<img class="bbc_img" src="/file?id=13167" alt="myimagess2.jpg">
<img src="/file?id=13168" class="bbc_img" >
<img src="/file?id=13169" alt="myimagess3.jpg">
<img  src="/foo" class="bbc_img" alt="myimagess.jpg4">

print for wq($html)->find('img[src^="/file?id="][class][alt]')->attr('src');
__END__
/file?id=13166
/file?id=13167

Learn from this: XPath is more powerful than CSS selectors, but CSS selectors are shorter.

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agreed, although I am waiting for the obligatory XSH2 solution to crown the winner ;--) –  mirod Jul 19 '13 at 9:57

A proper way to do this, using HTML::TreeBuilder::XPath. This will ignore rel and any other attribute, as well as not depend on the order of attributes in the tag.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use HTML::TreeBuilder::XPath;
use Test::More tests => 1;

my $root= HTML::TreeBuilder::XPath->new_from_content( do { local undef $/; <DATA> });

# this is the important part 
my @imgs= $root->findnodes( '//img[starts-with( @src,"/file?id=") and @class and @alt]');

# checks the results
my $hits= join ' ', map { "H:" . src_id( $_->{src}) } @imgs;
is( $hits, 'H:13166 H:13167', "one test");

# shows how to access the attributes
foreach my $img (@imgs)
  { warn "hit: src= $img->{src} - class=$img->{class} - alt: $img->{alt} - id= ", src_id( $img->{src}), "\n"; }

exit; 

sub src_id
  { my( $src)= @_;
    return $src=~  m{/file\?id=(.+)$} ? $1 : 'no id'; 
  }

__DATA__
<html>
  <head><title>Test HTML</title></head.
  <body>
    <img rel="lightbox[45451]" src="/file?id=13166" class="bbc_img" alt="myimagess1.jpg">
    <img class="bbc_img" src="/file?id=13167" alt="myimagess2.jpg">
    <img src="/file?id=13168" class="bbc_img" >
    <img src="/file?id=13169" alt="myimagess3.jpg">
    <img  src="/foo" class="bbc_img" alt="myimagess.jpg4">
  </body>
</html>
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This is trivial to do using a proper HTML parser. This program demonstrates using HTML::TreeBuilder and the look_down method.

It is searching for all elements with:

  • A tag name of 'img'
  • A src attribute that matches the regex qr|^/file\?id=|
  • A class attribute that matches the null regex (i.e. a class attribute with any value)
  • An alt attribute that matches the null regex

You don't say what you want to do with the elements once you've found them. This code just uses as_HTML to display them.

use strict;
use warnings;

use HTML::TreeBuilder;

my $html = HTML::TreeBuilder::XPath->new_from_file(\*DATA);
my @images = $html->look_down(
  _tag => 'img',
  src => qr|^/file\?id=|,
  class => qr//,
  alt => qr//
);
print $_->as_HTML, "\n" for @images;

__DATA__
<html>
  <head>
    <title>Page title</title>
  </head.
  <body>
    <img rel="lightbox[45451]" src="/file?id=13166" class="bbc_img" alt="myimagess.jpg">    
    <img  src="/file?id=13166" class="bbc_img" alt="myimagess.jpg">
    <img  src="/file" class="bbc_img" alt="myimagess.jpg"> /* mismatch id="" */
    <img  src="/file?id=13166" alt="myimagess.jpg">        /* no class="" */
    <img  src="/file?id=13166" class="bbc_img">            /* no alt="" */
  </body>
</html>

output

<img alt="myimagess.jpg" class="bbc_img" rel="lightbox[45451]" src="/file?id=13166" />
<img alt="myimagess.jpg" class="bbc_img" src="/file?id=13166" />
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