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Using algorithms like leveinstein ( leveinstein or difflib) , it is easy to find approximate matches.eg.

>>> import difflib
>>> difflib.SequenceMatcher(None,"amazing","amaging").ratio()
0.8571428571428571

The fuzzy matches can be detected by deciding a threshold as needed.

Current requirement : To find fuzzy substring based on a threshold in a bigger string.

eg.

large_string = "thelargemanhatanproject is a great project in themanhattincity"
query_string = "manhattan"
#result = "manhatan","manhattin" and their indexes in large_string

One brute force solution is to generate all substrings of length N-1 to N+1 ( or other matching length),where N is length of query_string, and use levenstein on them one by one and see the threshold.

Is there better solution available in python , preferably an included module in python 2.7 , or an externally available module .

Update : https://pypi.python.org/pypi/regex/ and https://github.com/eseraygun/python-alignment suit the requirement

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The regex solution does work for the given example. What problem are you having with it? – Veedrac May 31 '15 at 11:22
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The new regex library that's soon supposed to replace re includes fuzzy matching.

https://pypi.python.org/pypi/regex/

The fuzzy matching syntax looks fairly expressive, but this would give you a match with one or fewer insertions/additions/deletions.

import regex
regex.match('(amazing){e<=1}', 'amaging')
share|improve this answer
    
FWIW, the fuzzy matching sadly might be removed for the version intended to be added to the standard library... if it ever actually gets in, that is. – Veedrac May 31 '15 at 11:26
1  
I couldn't get this to work with the OP's "manhattan" example -- can you show the code to make that work? – Ethan Furman Jun 1 '15 at 17:25

How about using difflib.SequenceMatcher.get_matching_blocks?

>>> import difflib
>>> large_string = "thelargemanhatanproject"
>>> query_string = "manhattan"
>>> s = difflib.SequenceMatcher(None, large_string, query_string)
>>> sum(n for i,j,n in s.get_matching_blocks()) / float(len(query_string))
0.8888888888888888

>>> query_string = "banana"
>>> s = difflib.SequenceMatcher(None, large_string, query_string)
>>> sum(n for i,j,n in s.get_matching_blocks()) / float(len(query_string))
0.6666666666666666

UPDATE

import difflib

def matches(large_string, query_string, threshold):
    words = large_string.split()
    for word in words:
        s = difflib.SequenceMatcher(None, word, query_string)
        match = ''.join(word[i:i+n] for i, j, n in s.get_matching_blocks() if n)
        if len(match) / float(len(query_string)) >= threshold:
            yield match

large_string = "thelargemanhatanproject is a great project in themanhattincity"
query_string = "manhattan"
print list(matches(large_string, query_string, 0.8))

Above code print: ['manhatan', 'manhattn']

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How to retrieve the fuzzily matched substring from the blocks ? eg "manhatan" – DhruvPathak Jul 19 '13 at 9:27
    
@DhruvPathak, a = "thelargemanhatanproject"; b = "manhattan"; s = difflib.SequenceMatcher(None, a, b); ''.join(a[i:i+n] for i, j, n in s.get_matching_blocks() if n) – falsetru Jul 19 '13 at 9:36
    
it does not extract "manhatan" from the large_string, it results in the query_string "manhattan" (double t) – DhruvPathak Jul 19 '13 at 13:45
    
@DhruvPathak, ?? The code in my comment yield 'manhatan'. (single t) – falsetru Jul 19 '13 at 13:50
    
Can your code be extended to give multiple substrings too, as shown in the example edit in my quetsion ? – DhruvPathak Jul 19 '13 at 18:26

Recently I've written an alignment library for Python: https://github.com/eseraygun/python-alignment

Using it, you can perform both global and local alignments with arbitrary scoring strategies on any pair of sequences. Actually, in your case, you need semi-local alignments as you don't care for the substrings of query_string. I've simulated semi-local algorithm using local alignment and some heuristics in the following code but it is easy to extend the library for a proper implementation.

Here is the example code in the README file modified for your case.

from alignment.sequence import Sequence, GAP_ELEMENT
from alignment.vocabulary import Vocabulary
from alignment.sequencealigner import SimpleScoring, LocalSequenceAligner

large_string = "thelargemanhatanproject is a great project in themanhattincity"
query_string = "manhattan"

# Create sequences to be aligned.
a = Sequence(large_string)
b = Sequence(query_string)

# Create a vocabulary and encode the sequences.
v = Vocabulary()
aEncoded = v.encodeSequence(a)
bEncoded = v.encodeSequence(b)

# Create a scoring and align the sequences using local aligner.
scoring = SimpleScoring(1, -1)
aligner = LocalSequenceAligner(scoring, -1, minScore=5)
score, encodeds = aligner.align(aEncoded, bEncoded, backtrace=True)

# Iterate over optimal alignments and print them.
for encoded in encodeds:
    alignment = v.decodeSequenceAlignment(encoded)

    # Simulate a semi-local alignment.
    if len(filter(lambda e: e != GAP_ELEMENT, alignment.second)) != len(b):
        continue
    if alignment.first[0] == GAP_ELEMENT or alignment.first[-1] == GAP_ELEMENT:
        continue
    if alignment.second[0] == GAP_ELEMENT or alignment.second[-1] == GAP_ELEMENT:
        continue

    print alignment
    print 'Alignment score:', alignment.score
    print 'Percent identity:', alignment.percentIdentity()
    print

The output for minScore=5 is as follows.

m a n h a - t a n
m a n h a t t a n
Alignment score: 7
Percent identity: 88.8888888889

m a n h a t t - i
m a n h a t t a n
Alignment score: 5
Percent identity: 77.7777777778

m a n h a t t i n
m a n h a t t a n
Alignment score: 7
Percent identity: 88.8888888889

If you remove the minScore argument, you will get only the best scoring matches.

m a n h a - t a n
m a n h a t t a n
Alignment score: 7
Percent identity: 88.8888888889

m a n h a t t i n
m a n h a t t a n
Alignment score: 7
Percent identity: 88.8888888889

Note that all algorithms in the library have O(n * m) time complexity, n and m being the lengths of the sequences.

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This throws maximum recursion depth exceeded when run on very long passages... – duhaime Jul 15 '15 at 21:30

The approaches above are good, but I needed to find a small needle in lots of hay, and ended up approaching it like this:

from difflib import SequenceMatcher as SM
from nltk.util import ngrams
import codecs

needle = "this is the string we want to find"
hay    = "text text lots of text and more and more this string is the one we wanted to find and here is some more and even more still"

needle_length  = len(needle.split())
max_sim_val    = 0
max_sim_string = u""

for ngram in ngrams(hay.split(), needle_length + int(.2*needle_length)):
    hay_ngram = u" ".join(ngram)
    similarity = SM(None, hay_ngram, needle).ratio() 
    if similarity > max_sim_val:
        max_sim_val = similarity
        max_sim_string = hay_ngram

print max_sim_val, max_sim_string

Yields:

0.72972972973 this string is the one we wanted to find
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I use fuzzywuzzy to fuzzy match based on threshold and fuzzysearch to fuzzy extract words from the match.

process.extractBests takes a query, list of words and a cutoff score and returns a list of tuples of match and score above the cutoff score.

find_near_matches takes the result of process.extractBests and returns the start and end indices of words. I use the indices to build the words and use the built word to find the index in the large string. max_l_dist of find_near_matches is 'Levenshtein distance' which has to be adjusted to suit the needs.

from fuzzysearch import find_near_matches
from fuzzywuzzy import process

large_string = "thelargemanhatanproject is a great project in themanhattincity"
query_string = "manhattan"

def fuzzy_extract(qs, ls, threshold):
    '''fuzzy matches 'qs' in 'ls' and returns list of 
    tuples of (word,index)
    '''
    for word, _ in process.extractBests(qs, (ls,), score_cutoff=threshold):
        print('word {}'.format(word))
        for match in find_near_matches(qs, word, max_l_dist=1):
            match = word[match.start:match.end]
            print('match {}'.format(match))
            index = ls.find(match)
            yield (match, index)

Test;

print('query: {}\nstring: {}'.format(query_string, large_string))
for match,index in fuzzy_extract(query_string, large_string, 70):
    print('match: {}\nindex: {}'.format(match, index))

query_string = "citi"
print('query: {}\nstring: {}'.format(query_string, large_string))
for match,index in fuzzy_extract(query_string, large_string, 30):
    print('match: {}\nindex: {}'.format(match, index))

query_string = "greet"
print('query: {}\nstring: {}'.format(query_string, large_string))
for match,index in fuzzy_extract(query_string, large_string, 30):
    print('match: {}\nindex: {}'.format(match, index))

Output;
query: manhattan
string: thelargemanhatanproject is a great project in themanhattincity
match: manhatan
index: 8
match: manhattin
index: 49

query: citi
string: thelargemanhatanproject is a great project in themanhattincity
match: city
index: 58

query: greet
string: thelargemanhatanproject is a great project in themanhattincity
match: great
index: 29

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1  
Who downvoted please, comment. – Nizam Mohamed Jun 7 '15 at 20:15

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