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Using algorithms like leveinstein ( leveinstein or difflib) , it is easy to find approximate matches.eg.

>>> import difflib
>>> difflib.SequenceMatcher(None,"amazing","amaging").ratio()
0.8571428571428571

The fuzzy matches can be detected by deciding a threshold as needed.

Current requirement : To find fuzzy substring based on a threshold in a bigger string.

eg.

large_string = "thelargemanhatanproject is a great project in themanhattincity"
query_string = "manhattan"
#result = "manhatan","manhattin" and their indexes in large_string

One brute force solution is to generate all substrings of length N-1 to N+1 ( or other matching length),where N is length of query_string, and use levenstein on them one by one and see the threshold.

Is there better solution available in python , preferably an included module in python 2.7 , or an externally available module .

Edit: The current answer does not give required output.

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3 Answers 3

How about using difflib.SequenceMatcher.get_matching_blocks?

>>> import difflib
>>> large_string = "thelargemanhatanproject"
>>> query_string = "manhattan"
>>> s = difflib.SequenceMatcher(None, large_string, query_string)
>>> sum(n for i,j,n in s.get_matching_blocks()) / float(len(query_string))
0.8888888888888888

>>> query_string = "banana"
>>> s = difflib.SequenceMatcher(None, large_string, query_string)
>>> sum(n for i,j,n in s.get_matching_blocks()) / float(len(query_string))
0.6666666666666666

UPDATE

import difflib

def matches(large_string, query_string, threshold):
    words = large_string.split()
    for word in words:
        s = difflib.SequenceMatcher(None, word, query_string)
        match = ''.join(word[i:i+n] for i, j, n in s.get_matching_blocks() if n)
        if len(match) / float(len(query_string)) >= threshold:
            yield match

large_string = "thelargemanhatanproject is a great project in themanhattincity"
query_string = "manhattan"
print list(matches(large_string, query_string, 0.8))

Above code print: ['manhatan', 'manhattn']

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How to retrieve the fuzzily matched substring from the blocks ? eg "manhatan" –  DhruvPathak Jul 19 '13 at 9:27
    
@DhruvPathak, a = "thelargemanhatanproject"; b = "manhattan"; s = difflib.SequenceMatcher(None, a, b); ''.join(a[i:i+n] for i, j, n in s.get_matching_blocks() if n) –  falsetru Jul 19 '13 at 9:36
    
it does not extract "manhatan" from the large_string, it results in the query_string "manhattan" (double t) –  DhruvPathak Jul 19 '13 at 13:45
    
@DhruvPathak, ?? The code in my comment yield 'manhatan'. (single t) –  falsetru Jul 19 '13 at 13:50
    
Can your code be extended to give multiple substrings too, as shown in the example edit in my quetsion ? –  DhruvPathak Jul 19 '13 at 18:26

Recently I've written an alignment library for Python: https://github.com/eseraygun/python-alignment

Using it, you can perform both global and local alignments with arbitrary scoring strategies on any pair of sequences. Actually, in your case, you need semi-local alignments as you don't care for the substrings of query_string. I've simulated semi-local algorithm using local alignment and some heuristics in the following code but it is easy to extend the library for a proper implementation.

Here is the example code in the README file modified for your case.

from alignment.sequence import Sequence, GAP_ELEMENT
from alignment.vocabulary import Vocabulary
from alignment.sequencealigner import SimpleScoring, LocalSequenceAligner

large_string = "thelargemanhatanproject is a great project in themanhattincity"
query_string = "manhattan"

# Create sequences to be aligned.
a = Sequence(large_string)
b = Sequence(query_string)

# Create a vocabulary and encode the sequences.
v = Vocabulary()
aEncoded = v.encodeSequence(a)
bEncoded = v.encodeSequence(b)

# Create a scoring and align the sequences using local aligner.
scoring = SimpleScoring(1, -1)
aligner = LocalSequenceAligner(scoring, -1, minScore=5)
score, encodeds = aligner.align(aEncoded, bEncoded, backtrace=True)

# Iterate over optimal alignments and print them.
for encoded in encodeds:
    alignment = v.decodeSequenceAlignment(encoded)

    # Simulate a semi-local alignment.
    if len(filter(lambda e: e != GAP_ELEMENT, alignment.second)) != len(b):
        continue
    if alignment.first[0] == GAP_ELEMENT or alignment.first[-1] == GAP_ELEMENT:
        continue
    if alignment.second[0] == GAP_ELEMENT or alignment.second[-1] == GAP_ELEMENT:
        continue

    print alignment
    print 'Alignment score:', alignment.score
    print 'Percent identity:', alignment.percentIdentity()
    print

The output for minScore=5 is as follows.

m a n h a - t a n
m a n h a t t a n
Alignment score: 7
Percent identity: 88.8888888889

m a n h a t t - i
m a n h a t t a n
Alignment score: 5
Percent identity: 77.7777777778

m a n h a t t i n
m a n h a t t a n
Alignment score: 7
Percent identity: 88.8888888889

If you remove the minScore argument, you will get only the best scoring matches.

m a n h a - t a n
m a n h a t t a n
Alignment score: 7
Percent identity: 88.8888888889

m a n h a t t i n
m a n h a t t a n
Alignment score: 7
Percent identity: 88.8888888889

Note that all algorithms in the library have O(n * m) time complexity, n and m being the lengths of the sequences.

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The new regex library that's soon supposed to replace re includes fuzzy matching.

https://pypi.python.org/pypi/regex/

The fuzzy matching syntax looks fairly expressive, but this would give you a match with one or fewer insertions/additions/deletions.

import regex
regex.match('(amazing){e<=1}', 'amaging')
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