Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
public class abc{
public getTable(String table){
    //some complex logic here.//to be skipped while testing
    return "schemaName." + table;
}

public buildQueryMethod1(){
    String sql = "select fields from "+getTable("table1") +
                "union" +
                "select fields from " + getTable("table2") +
                .
                .
                .
    return sql;
}
 }

I want to test buildQueryMethod1(). How do I mock the getTable method so that it returns "ABC." string to the argument passed to it and return the resulting string any number of times independent of the argument passed and number of times the method is called.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Even though you should be injecting in a separate class to do the table name generation, you can use Mockito's spy functionality. It looks like your code won't compile but, in your test do something like this:

public class ExampleTest() {

    private abc example = new abc();

    @Test
    public void test() {
        abc spy1 = spy(abc);

        stub(spy1. getTable("table1")).toReturn("ABC");
        stub(spy1. getTable("table2")).toReturn("ABC")

        // do some testing on example...
    }
}

You would have to import the Mockito static stub and spy methods.

share|improve this answer
    
Oops, I just realised you were using Powermock, not Mockito! –  Ayub Malik Jul 19 '13 at 10:15

The best way would be to take advantage of the matchers provided by Mockito:

@Test
public void test() {
   abc spyInstance = PowerMockito.spy(abc); //Since it's a public method
                                            //you can probably just use
                                            //Mockito here.
   doReturn("ABC.").when(abc).getTable(org.mockito.Matchers.anyString());

   //do some testing
}

This isn't much different than @Ayub's answer. The main difference is the use of anyString().

Sometimes it's useful to return the argument that was passed to the method.

@Test
public void test() {
   abc spyInstance = PowerMockito.spy(abc); //Since it's a public method
                                            //you can probably just use
                                            //Mockito here.
   doAnswer(new Answer<String>() {
      @Override
      public String answer(InvocationOnMock invocation) throws Throwable {
         return (String)invocation.getArguments()[0];
      }
   }).when(abc).getTable(org.mockito.Matchers.anyString());

   //do some testing
}

This goes a little above and beyond what you need but can be useful, especially when you move the annonymous inner class to an inner class and reuse the behavior across multiple tests.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.