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I can understand simple recursion, such as:

def count(n):
    if n <= 0:
        return
    else:
        print n
        count(n-1)

count(3)

However, when faced with more complicated code, such as, an implementation of Koch snowflake:

def koch(order, size):
    if order == 0:
            t.forward(size)
    else:
            koch(order-1, size/3)
            t.left(60)
            koch(order-1, size/3)
            t.right(120)
            koch(order-1, size/3)
            t.left(60)
            koch(order-1, size/3)

koch(1, 100)

I get confused. I do not understand how to follow these multiple recursive function calls.

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closed as too broad by Zaheer Ahmed, Sankar Ganesh, Lior Kogan, Tyler Crompton, Rikesh Jul 19 '13 at 13:54

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

13  
To understand recursion, first you must understand recursion. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Jul 19 '13 at 11:37
2  
practice practice and keep practicing... until u start understanding. –  Zaheer Ahmed Jul 19 '13 at 11:38
    
note that in most cases an iterative algorithm is the better approach. It won't need the stack and extra function calls. And there is a rule: Every recursion can be replaced by iteration. So, search for the iterative ones if you wanna have fun! :) Like this –  hek2mgl Jul 19 '13 at 11:43
    
@hek2mgl, but the iterative approach is prone to accumulation of floating point errors. It's easier to circumvent with the recursive approach. –  gnibbler Jul 19 '13 at 11:52
    
First you need to know what is this t. Looks like the algorythm moves it forward, then changes direction, move one third forward, changes direction again, moves a thirr of a third....and so on, until order is 0. But it seems you should have not a single t, because there's not just one arm to increase, but lots of arms over arms. –  Daniel Jul 19 '13 at 11:56

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't think it's especially easy for anyone to visualize the execution path in detail in their head. Drawing a tree, with the nodes representing the individual recursive calls, is a good way to visualize it on paper. If each node is a bubble, you can put information about variable states, etc., in them. In the situation where there are multiple recursive calls, each node will have multiple trees under it, representing a timeline.

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This is how I ended up grasping it, thanks! –  nso95 Jul 31 '13 at 6:43

Your Koch snowflake example is a good one. What does the snowflake consist of? In the first iteration (order == 0), it starts out as a simple line. This is the base case.

________

Now, for the next level of recursion (order == 1), that base case is split into four sub-lines that form an inverted V. To achieve this V, you need to build four lines at the appropriate angles to each other (for which you need the t.left(60) and similar commands).

Each of these lines is (regarded by itself) an instance of the base case, again. It's just three times smaller. That's what you see in koch(order-1, size/3).

   /\
__/  \__

Now imagine the next level of recursion - each line is again split up into four sublines. The pattern continues...

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For koch(1, 100) it will look like this:

koch(1, 100)
->
    koch(0, 33)
      order == 1, so stop recursing down this branch
    <-
    t goes left
    koch(0, 33)
      order == 1, so stop recursing down this branch
    <-
    t goes right
    koch(0, 33)
      order == 1, so stop recursing down this branch
    <-
    t goes left
    koch(0, 33)
      order == 1, so stop recursing down this branch
    <-
<-
done

For koch(2, 100) the first call to koch will then expand out to the above,

koch(2, 100)
->
    koch(1, 100)
    ->
        koch(0, 33)
          order == 1, so stop recursing down this branch
        <-
        t goes left
        ...
    ...
    t goes left
    ...

Try to trace it out on paper as has been suggested. You will end up with a tree like structure.

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Try, something along the lines of:

def koch(order, size):
    print 'koch(', order, size, ')'
    if order == 0:
            t.forward(size)
            print 'Got to the bottom of it'
    else:
            koch(order-1, size/3)
            t.left(60)
            koch(order-1, size/3)
            t.right(120)
            koch(order-1, size/3)
            t.left(60)
            koch(order-1, size/3)

koch(1, 10)

And you should see how each call calls koch until it finally gets to the bottom of the chain.

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To understand the code it helps to have a look at the first steps of creating a koch snowflake. In every recursion step you have a triangle, an the code overlays anotherone. Now you have new triangles for which the code is called - and everything starts from beginning.

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The python tutor web site can help in visualising program flows http://www.pythontutor.com/

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