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I'm working on a TCP server right now and got to a point where I am wondering how much data I should push through the connection. The question is what will happen if I send a large amount of data (for example 10 MB) but the connection is slow (like 64 kBit/sec)? Will the data stay within the buffer of the operating system or will it be pushed out to the internet and be buffered in some kind of internet-provider-server? Would it make sense to measure the transmission speed rates, to push out only as much data as the connection can handle?

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what will happen if I send a large amount of data (for example 10 MB) but the connection is slow (like 64 kBit/sec)?

Your send() will block in blocking mode, or return -1/EAGAIN/EWOULDBLOCK in non-blocking mode.

Will the data stay within the buffer of the operating system

Yes.

or will it be pushed out to the internet and be buffered in some kind of internet-provider-server?

No.

Would it make sense to measure the transmission speed rates, to push out only as much data as the connection can handle?

Definitely not. TCP already does exactly that.

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TCP is normally built with the assumption that buffering will happen in arbitrary places. Some will be in your own application (when the write call blocks), some will be in the OS, some in the routers on the way and some in the OS of the receiver (before the app read the data).

If you write a really large amount of data and the link is far slower your app will block as the OS buffers are of limited size. If you don't want that you will need to use non-blocking APIs and return to service the socket as needed.

If you care about latency then TCP is not a good fit, it tries to optimize bandwidth and fairness.

If you will try to measure transfer speed on the write side only you will get a skewed result as the first few megabytes will fly by as they are queued by the OS and the routers and then everything will slow to a crawl which is approximately the real speed but will jitter a lot. I can't see a really good reason to do it.

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