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I have one file where the contents looks like:

pch
rch
channel
cap
nch
kappa
.
.
.
kary
ban
....

Now I want to read my file from nch to kary and copying those lines only in some other file. How can I do this in Perl?

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6 Answers 6

If I understand your question correctly, this is pretty simple.

    #!perl -w
    use strict;
    use autodie;

    open my $in,'<',"File1.txt";
    open my $out,'>',"File2.txt";

    while(<$in>){
    print $out $_ if /^nch/ .. /^kary/;
    }
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4  
also : $ perl -lne 'print if /nch/../kary/' file >output –  ghostdog74 Nov 21 '09 at 6:45
    
The '-l' option is not necessary, but the one-liner works nicely as a simplification of Mike's script. A program that builds file names in like that is not a general program, Mike. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 21 '09 at 7:07
2  
Still, +1 for the use of range notation. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 21 '09 at 7:08
    
@Jonathan, I assume I'll have to stick to this use of file open format. I know the (<>) thing processes the command line parameters, but it never works for me, perhaps because of the way I run the Perl scripts on Windows. But thanks for the comment and the upvote:) –  Mike Nov 21 '09 at 7:50
    
@Mike +1 But the answer would be much better if it read from standard input and wrote to standard output. Is there a good reason why you're running your scripts in some non-standard way that doesn't allow you to use <>? I've heard you mention this problem before and was puzzled. Anyway, keep up the good work: you're definitely improving your Perl chops. –  FMc Nov 21 '09 at 16:23
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From perlfaq6's answer to How can I pull out lines between two patterns that are themselves on different lines?


You can use Perl's somewhat exotic .. operator (documented in perlop):

perl -ne 'print if /START/ .. /END/' file1 file2 ...

If you wanted text and not lines, you would use

perl -0777 -ne 'print "$1\n" while /START(.*?)END/gs' file1 file2 ...

But if you want nested occurrences of START through END, you'll run up against the problem described in the question in this section on matching balanced text.

Here's another example of using ..:

while (<>) {
	$in_header =   1  .. /^$/;
	$in_body   = /^$/ .. eof;
# now choose between them
} continue {
	$. = 0 if eof;	# fix $.
}
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You could use this in 'sed':

sed -n /nch/,/kary/p $file

You could use 's2p' to convert this to Perl.

You could also write pure Perl:

while (<>)
{
    next unless /nch/;
    print;
    while (<>)
    {
        print;
        last if /kary/;
    }
}

Strictly, both these solutions will print each set of lines from 'nch' to 'kary'; if 'nch' appears more than once, it will print more than one chunk of code. It is easy to fix that, especially in the pure Perl ('sed' solution left as an exercise for the reader).

OUTER:
while (<>)
{
    next unless /nch/;
    print;
    while (<>)
    {
        print;
        last OUTER if /kary/;
    }
}

Also, the solutions look for 'nch' and 'kary' as part of the line - not for the whole line. If you need them to match the whole line, use '/^nch$/' etc as the regex.

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using 2 while loops is not necessary, is it? –  ghostdog74 Nov 21 '09 at 6:28
    
It depends on whether you want to use variables other than '$_'. If you use a variable (as in Hairy Jock's solution), then no, the double loop is not necessary. If you do it with no extra variables, the second loop takes the place of the state variable. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 21 '09 at 6:32
1  
There's a direct oneliner perl equivalent to your awk example: perl -ne 'print if /foo/../bar/' –  hobbs Nov 21 '09 at 8:37
    
IMO, using 2 while loops like that is not necessary and bad design. what if i have many more variables to set? Explicitly declaring variables is more understandable and appropriate. –  ghostdog74 Nov 21 '09 at 9:25
    
@hobbs: yes, there is a one-liner equivalent to the version without the label. @ghostdog74: if I have more complex stuff to deal with, I use variables - this isn't complex, so I wrote a solution that didn't use them. I didn't agonize over how to do it - it is an idiom I've used before, and will use again, when appropriate. And it is only appropriate in simple cases. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 21 '09 at 14:44
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Something like:

$filter = 0;
while (<>) {
  chomp;
  $filter = 1 if (! $filter && /^nch$/);
  $filter = 0 if ($filter && /^ban$/);
  print($_, "\n") if ($filter);
}

should work.

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The chomp is not strictly necessary, and not chomping simplifies the printing. Also, it not clear why you chose 'ban' when the question is asking about 'kary'; that could be regarded as making unwarranted assumptions about the data layout. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 21 '09 at 5:32
2  
The "chomp" allows matching the entire line - /nch/ or /ban/ are simply too permissive when grinches or banshees arrive. –  Hairy Jock Nov 21 '09 at 6:08
3  
The 'chomp' is not needed to make the '/^nch$/' matches work. And you do what the question asks with: my $filter = 0; while (<>) { $filter = 1 if (! $filter && /^nch$/); print if ($filter); $filter = 0 if ($filter && /^kary$/); }. Note the repositioning of the print and the test for 'kary'. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 21 '09 at 6:29
    
"There's usually more than one way to skin a cat", to paraphrase Larry Wall. –  Hairy Jock Nov 21 '09 at 6:43
2  
True, but some ways are better than others. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 21 '09 at 7:00
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if you only want to read one block, in gawk

gawk '/kary/&&f{print;exit}/nch/{f=1}f' file

in Perl

perl -lne '$f && /kary/ && print && exit;$f=1 if/nch/; $f && print' file

or

while (<>) {
    chomp;
    if ($f && /kary/) {
        print $_."\n";
        last;
    }
    if (/nch/) { $f = 1; }
    print $_ ."\n" if $f;
}
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Both the Perl and the Awk scripts print kary and terminate if it appears before the first nch - which is not part of the spec. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 21 '09 at 6:36
    
fixed. thks for pointing out –  ghostdog74 Nov 21 '09 at 9:41
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Here is a tested solution with in-code comments. Assuming you don't want to include 'nch' and 'kary' in the output:

use strict;
use warnings;

#open the input file
open (my $fh_in, '<', 'filename_in.txt');

#read each line until reaching 'nch'
while(<$fh_in>){
    #exit loop when 'nch' is found at the beginning of the line 
    last if ($_ =~ m{\A nch }xms);
}

#open the output file
open (my $fh_out, '>', 'filename_out.txt');

#print each line until finding 'kary'
while(<$fh_in>){

    #exit loop when 'kary' is found at the beginning of the line
    last if ($_ =~ m{\A kary }xms);

    print $fh_out $_;
}

If you wanted to get the input and output file names from the command line, you could use $ARGV[0] and $ARGV[1] to pull in the first and second argument from the command line. However, only do this if you are the only one running this program.


However, if you do want to include 'nch' and 'kary' in the output:

use strict;
use warnings;

#open the input file
open (my $fh_in, '<', 'filename_in.txt');

#open the output file
open (my $fh_out, '>', 'filename_out.txt');

#read each line until reaching 'nch'
while (my $line = <$fh_in>){

    #exit loop after 'nch' is found at the beginning of the line 
    if ($line =~ m{\A nch }xms){

        #print line containing 'nch'
        print $fh_out $line;

        #exit loop
        last;
    }
}

#print each line until finding 'kary'
while (my $line = <$fh_in>){

    #print the line to the output file
    print $fh_out $line;

    #exit loop when 'kary' is found at the beginning of the line
    last if $line =~ m{\A kary }xms;
}
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Thanks to Mike and brian for introducing me to .. as a flip-flop operator. You can also use ^..^ to exclude the matching lines, ^.. to exclude the first matching line, or ..^ to exclude the last matching line. (I'm not sure where else to find this info, but Larry Wall mentioned it at nntp.perl.org/group/perl.perl6.language/2005/11/msg24098.html. The flip-flop operators in Perl6 will be ff and fff, like .. and ... in Perl 5. Compare brian's and Mike's succinct answers using the flip-flop operator to my verbose, though correct, answer above. –  Christopher Bottoms Nov 23 '09 at 15:43
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