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As a side question here What's the easiest way to do something like delegate multicast in F# I think it maybe better to raise a full question with proper title.

This version wouldn't cause recursion: (Here notify seems immutable in d)

let mutable notify = fun x -> x
let wrap f i = f(i); i

let a x = printf "%A" x
let d = (notify >> (wrap a)) // point free
notify <- d

notify "ss"

This version would. (Here notify seems mutable in d)

let mutable notify = fun x -> x
let wrap f i = f(i); i

let a x = printf "%A" x  
let d x =
    (notify >> (wrap a)) x // normal function
notify <- d

notify "ss" // endless loop

Another fail version:

let mutable notify = fun x -> x
let wrap f i = f(i); i

let a x = printf "%A" x  
let d =
    fun x -> (notify >> (wrap a)) x // Here
notify <- d

notify "ss" // endless loop

Where can I find any guideline or more resource into why we have this behaviours discrepancy . Is it tied to a particularly compiler/ language or there is a theory for it which applied to all functional languages?

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1 Answer 1

Uncontrolled mutability is the reason for this behavior. Other languages like Haskell provides controlled mutability using Software transaction memory techniques which avoid these kind of problems. Also, eager evaluation plays an important role here.

let d = (notify >> (wrap a)) : In this case whatever value of notify has will be composed with (wrap a) and the result will be assigned to d

let d x = (notify >> (wrap a)) x : Here, the body of the function is not executed untill you actually call the d function and hence you get the mutated value of notify

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