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Let's say I have std::list of some class T.

What is the best way to manage these elements? Considering that only the manager(I mean - the one owner) can add or remove items from the list.

1)

std::list < T* > myList;

//adding the new element
myList.push_back( new T(..) );

//deleting the one element
...roaming through the list...got it...
delete *iterator;
myList.erase(iterator);

2)

std::list < std::unique_ptr<T> > myList;

//adding the new element
myList.push_back ( std::unique_ptr<T>( new T(..) );

//deleting the one element
...roaming through the list...got it...
myList.erase(iterator);
share|improve this question
    
"depends" is a good answer, but I would go with2 in most cases. Move sematics will do all the deleting for you, which is just a pain in the butt otherwise. –  IdeaHat Jul 19 '13 at 13:13
    
What's wrong with std::list<T>? –  Kerrek SB Jul 19 '13 at 13:14
3  
Do you need to store pointers (for polymorphism, perhaps)? If not, std::list<T> would be better still. –  Mike Seymour Jul 19 '13 at 13:14
2  
Anytime you need to dynamically allocate memory, you have to define a policy concerning the lifetime of the objects. If std::unique_ptr fulfills the requirements of the policy, it's great. If it doesn't, don't use it. I find it hard to imagine a case where an std::unique_ptr would be appropriate in a container, but I'm sure that there are cases. (Containers are designed to contains copies of objects. And std::unique_ptr has rather special copy semantics. Having said that, there is at least one time in the past where I would have used it, had it been available.) –  James Kanze Jul 19 '13 at 13:18
    
When I tried to use std::list<T>, in particular: myList.push_back ( T() ); I saw there was created a new object using copy constructor. I felt it was bad –  Alexey Teplyakov Jul 19 '13 at 13:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If the ownership model in your program is that the list "owns" the elements inside it, the second way (i.e. with unique_ptr<T>) is better. It lets C++ manage the resources of your list automatically, which is especially important in situations when the list is declared in a local scope, because you do not have to worry about exiting the scope prematurely.

share|improve this answer
    
What if I need to delete my object right now? What about garbage c. in this case? –  Alexey Teplyakov Jul 19 '13 at 13:17
    
@AlexeyTeplyakov If you must delete an object inside the list without touching the list, it means that your ownership model is different from "the list owns objects inside it"; if the list truly owns its objects as the use of unique_ptr<T> suggests, deleting an object should be performed by erasing its unique_ptr<T> from the list. Also note that "plain" pointers do not give you advantage or disadvantage in case when you must delete an object. –  dasblinkenlight Jul 19 '13 at 13:23
    
You got me wrong. Will there be a delay in the removal using garbage collector? In case of unique ptr –  Alexey Teplyakov Jul 19 '13 at 13:28
1  
@AlexeyTeplyakov There is no garbage collector in C++ - unique_ptr<T> calls the destructor of the object that it points to as soon as the destructor of unique_ptr<T> itself is called. There is no delay there - when you erase an object (in this case unique_ptr<T>) from the list, the list destroys that object before erase() returns. –  dasblinkenlight Jul 19 '13 at 13:33
1  
@AlexeyTeplyakov Causing a unique_ptr to go out of scope isn't any different than causing the last shared_ptr to an object to go out of scope. When the last shared_ptr goes out of scope, the same thing happens. The object is immediately deleted. –  Andre Kostur Jul 19 '13 at 14:03

In the words of Herb Sutter's GotW column:

Guideline: To allocate an object, prefer to write make_unique by default, and write make_shared when you know the object’s lifetime is going to be managed by using shared_ptrs.

std::list < std::unique_ptr<T> > myList;

//adding the new element
myList.push_back ( std::make_unique<T>(..) );

//deleting the one element
...roaming through the list...got it...
myList.erase(iterator);

You can use Stephan T. Lavavej's accepted C+14 proposal for the std::make_unique implementation.

share|improve this answer
    
1) Is there a std::make_unique in c++11 ? 2) What if I need to delete my object right now? What about garbage c. in this case? –  Alexey Teplyakov Jul 19 '13 at 13:14
    
@AlexeyTeplyakov: No; hopefully that will be in C++14. –  Mike Seymour Jul 19 '13 at 13:15
    
@AlexeyTeplyakov removing the pointer from the container will call the destructor of the element pointed to. There is no need for "naked" delete. –  TemplateRex Jul 19 '13 at 13:19

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