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In Javascript how can I test if the user has the quicktime plugin and java plugins installed?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

For Java, you can use navigator.javaEnabled(). Or you can look here: http://www.pinlady.net/PluginDetect/JavaDetect.htm

For QuickTime, you can do:

var QtPlugin = navigator.plugins["Quicktime"];
if (QtPlugin) {//QuickTime is installed}

See here: http://javascript.internet.com/miscellaneous/check-plugins.html

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this doesn't work, plugins are named with version number so your code comes up undefined even when it's installed –  lmmx Mar 27 at 17:06

This of course does not work in IE. The only way to check plugins in IE is using VB script, and it is very strange and messy. You can only test for specific plugin versions, for example, "quicktime" won't cut it. You have to specify the version, which is not published for versions older than 5, and I can't find a reference for version 7

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The above examples haven't got the answer to the QuickTime part of your question, so here's what I'm writing right now even though the question has been closed and is a little old.

var p = navigator.plugins;
var qtcheck = 0;
for (i=0;i<p.length;i++) {
  if (p[i].name.match(/QuickTime/) != null) {
     qtcheck++
  }
}
if (qtcheck > 0) { // do nothing, QuickTime is intalled }
else {
videos = document.querySelectorAll('object[type="video/quicktime"]')
// use .getElementById instead if there are multiple videos
// replace them with document.createElement('img')

For a more comprehensive and foolproof method i.e. without worry of a plug-in being renamed for whatever reason, you can check within the array of MimeTypes for type="video/quicktime" which is the ultimate answer of whether the object will be supported (or if you're not using the QT video, whatever else you're using it for instead).

This means creating a loop inside the loop through the plugins instead, but is a more firm verification than just a string match:

function checkQT() {
var p = navigator.plugins;
var QT = false; // assume you don't have it
  for (i=0;i<p.length;i++) {
    for (j=0;j<p[i].length;j++) {
      if (p[i][j].type == "video/quicktime") {
      QT = true;
      return true;
      }
      else continue;
      return false;
    }
  }
}

I searched around online and found a bunch of great IE fallback scripts here (not sure if this paste service code is going to persist so I gisted it for posterity), from which I took the QuickTime one:

function IEhasQT() {
  if (!window.ActiveXObject) return false;
  try { if(new ActiveXObject("QuickTime.QuickTime")) return true; }
  catch (e) {}
  try { if (new ActiveXObject('QuickTimeCheckObject.QuickTimeCheck')) return true; }
  catch (e) {}
  return false;
}

I tested some others and they just didn't work - catching the exceptions is important.

If you're doing what I'm doing (QuickTime fallback to a gif animation) you might want to take the attributes of the video to provide to the image (or whatever else you're using). The downside to this is that you have to couple it to an onscroll as well as onload (or use Jquery) as the browser is liable to try and find the element before the DOM has loaded no matter how you try and avoid it.

If anyone else reading this is looking for a similar answer, the code to do so is

function noQTfallback() {
  var vid1 = document.getElementById("<insert your object id>");
  var vid1gif = document.createElement('img');
  vid1gif.setAttribute("src","<insert your URL source>");
  vid1gif.setAttribute("style",vid1.getAttribute("style"));
  document.getElementById("<...>").replaceChild(vid1gif, vid1);
}

function IEhasQT() {
// as above
}

function checkQT() {
// as above
}

function QTbackup(){
if (!checkQT() && !IEhasQT()) {
  noQTfallback();
}
}

window.document.body.onload = QTbackup;
window.onscroll = QTbackup;

Oddly, you can have multiple versions of QuickTime installed, my Chrome browser on Windows has 7 copies... Luckily I have a Chromebook which doesn't have QT plug-in either installed or available, so I'm checking and seeing what works to distinguish it, this is the best I've come up with.

I never understood why testing was so important until looking at everyone's awful code on this online, incredible. I know no one cares about IE but basic things like || instead of && are just bad to leave lying around for other developers to reuse.

I've checked this on Windows, Linux and Android (IE and Chrome). The onscroll gives a bit of a jump but without Jquery or some other framework it's unavoidable I guess (and beats "plug-in not supported" !

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