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I'm reading about volatile keyword in Java and completely understand the theory part of it.

But, what I'm searching for is, a good case example, which shows what would happen if variable wasn't volatile and if it were.

Below code snippet doesn't work as expected ( from aioobe)

class Test extends Thread {

    boolean keepRunning = true;

    public void run() {
        while (keepRunning) {
        }

        System.out.println("Thread terminated.");
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
        Test t = new Test();
        t.start();
        Thread.sleep(1000);
        t.keepRunning = false;
        System.out.println("keepRunning set to false.");
    }
}

Ideally, if keepRunning wasn't volatile, thread should keep on running indefinetely. But, it does stop after few seconds.

I've got two basic question :-

  • Can anyone explain volatile with example ? Not with theory from JLS.
  • Is volatile substitute for synchronization ? Does it achieve atomicity ?
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A past post talks of it extensively stackoverflow.com/questions/7212155/java-threading-volatile –  AurA Jul 19 '13 at 14:04
2  
You are thinking backwards. Ideally, if keepRunning wasn't volatile, thread should keep on running indefinitely. Actually, it is the opposite: adding volatile guarantees that the change to the field will be visible. Without the keyword, simply there are no guarantees at all, anything can happen; you cannot state that thread should keep on running [...]. –  Bruno Reis Jul 19 '13 at 14:23
1  
Here's the thing: memory visibility bugs are by their nature hard (impossible?) to demonstrate by a simple example that will fail every time. Assuming you've got a multi-core machine, your example will probably fail at least a couple times if you run it a lot (say, 1000 runs). If you've got a big program -- such that the whole program and its objects don't fit on a CPU cache, for instance -- then that increases the probability of seeing a bug. Basically, concurrency bugs are such that if the theory says it can break, it probably will, but only once every few months, and probably in production. –  yshavit Jul 19 '13 at 14:28

7 Answers 7

Volatile --> Guarantees visibility and NOT atomicity

Synchronization (Locking) --> Guarantees visibility and atomicity (if done properly)

Volatile is not a substitute for synchronization

Use volatile only when you are updating the reference and not performing some other operations on it.

Example:

volatile int i = 0;

public void incrementI(){
   i++;
}

will not be thread safe without use of synchronization or AtomicInteger as incrementing is an compound operation.

Why program does not run indefinitely?

Well that depends on various circumstances. In most cases JVM is smart enough to flush the contents.

Correct use of volatile discusses various possible uses of volatile. Using volatile correctly is tricky, I would say "When in doubt, Leave it out", use synchronized block instead.

Also:

synchronized block can be used in place of volatile but the inverse is not true.

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For your particular example: if not declared volatile the server JVM could hoist the keepRunning variable out of the loop because it is not modified in the loop (turning it into an infinite loop), but the client JVM would not. That is why you see different results.

General explanation about volatile variables follows:

When a field is declared volatile, the compiler and runtime are put on notice that this variable is shared and that operations on it should not be reordered with other memory operations. Volatile variables are not cached in registers or in caches where they are hidden from other processors, so a read of a volatile variable always returns the most recent write by any thread.

The visibility effects of volatile variables extend beyond the value of the volatile variable itself. When thread A writes to a volatile variable and subsequently thread B reads that same variable, the values of all variables that were visible to A prior to writing to the volatile variable become visible to B after reading the volatile variable

The most common use for volatile variables is as a completion, interruption, or status flag:

  volatile boolean flag;
  while (!flag)  {
     // do something untill flag is true
  }

Volatile variables can be used for other kinds of state information, but more care is required when attempting this. For example, the semantics of volatile are not strong enough to make the increment operation (count++) atomic, unless you can guarantee that the variable is written only from a single thread.

Locking can guarantee both visibility and atomicity; volatile variables can only guarantee visibility.

You can use volatile variables only when all the following criteria are met:

  • Writes to the variable do not depend on its current value, or you can ensure that only a single thread ever updates the value;
  • The variable does not participate in invariants with other state variables; and
  • Locking is not required for any other reason while the variable is being accessed.

Debugging tip: be sure to always specify the -server JVM command line switch when invoking the JVM, even for development and testing. The server JVM performs more optimization than the client JVM, such as hoisting variables out of a loop that are not modified in the loop; code that might appear to work in the development environment (client JVM) can break in the deployment environment (server JVM).

This is excerpt from Java Concurrency in Practice, the best book you can find about this subject.

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When a variable is volatile, it is guaranteeing that it will not be cached and that different threads will see the updated value. However, not marking it volatile does not guarantee the oppostie. volatile was one of those things that was broken in the JVM for a long time and still not always well understood (and often left out by developers). So the JVM is somewhat smart about not caching variable values indefinitely, though you should mark it volatile.

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1  
Please explain with code. I alredy know its theory –  tm99 Jul 19 '13 at 14:06
    
In a modern multi-processor @Jeff, your last comment is somewhat wrong/misleading. The JVM is really smart about not flushing the value since to do so is a performance hit. –  Gray Jul 19 '13 at 14:13
    
When keepRunning is set to false by main, the thread still sees the update because the JVM is smart about flushing the value. This is not guaranteed though (see comment from @Gray above). –  Jeff Storey Jul 19 '13 at 14:24
    
@Gray - corrected the comment –  Jeff Storey Jul 19 '13 at 14:24

volatile is not going to necessarily create giant changes, depending on the JVM and compiler. However, for many (edge) cases, it can be the difference between optimization causing a variable's changes to fail to be noticed as opposed to them being correctly written.

Basically, an optimizer may choose to put non-volatile variables on registers or on the stack. If another thread changes them in the heap or the classes' primitives, the other thread will keep looking for it on the stack, and it'll be stale.

volatile ensures such optimizations don't happen and all reads and writes are directly to the heap or another place where all threads will see it.

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Ideally, if keepRunning wasn't volatile, thread should keep on running indefinitely. But, it does stop after few seconds.

If you are running in a single-processor or if your system is very busy, the OS may be swapping out the threads which causes some levels of cache invalidation. As others have mentioned, not having a volatile doesn't mean that memory will not be shared but the JVM is trying to not synchronize memory if it can for performance reasons.

Another think to note is that System.out.println(...) is synchronized because the underlying PrintStream does synchronization to stop overlapping output. So you are getting memory synchronization "for free" in the main-thread. This still doesn't explain why the reading loop sees the updates at all however.

Whether the println(...) lines are in or out, your program spins for me under Java6 on a MacBook Pro with an Intel i7.

Can anyone explain volatile with example ? Not with theory from JLS.

I think your example is good. Not sure why it isn't working with all System.out.println(...) statements removed. It works for me.

Is volatile substitute for synchronization ? Does it achieve atomicity ?

In terms of memory synchronization, volatile throws up the same memory barriers as a synchronized block except that the volatile barrier is uni-directional versus bi-directional. volatile reads throw up a load-barrier while writes throw up a store-barrier. A synchronized block is a bi-directional barrier.

In terms of atomicity, however, the answer is "it depends". If you are reading or writing a value from a field then volatile provides proper atomicity. However, incrementing a volatile field suffers from the limitation that ++ is actually 3 operations: read, increment, write. In that case or more complex mutex cases, a full synchronized block is in order.

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I commented both SOPln statements, but it still gets stopped after few seconds .. can you show me an example which would work as expected ? –  tm99 Jul 19 '13 at 14:09
    
Are you running on a single processor system @tm99? Because your program spins forever for me on a Macbook Pro Java6. –  Gray Jul 19 '13 at 14:09
    
I m running on Win Xp 32 bit Java 6 –  tm99 Jul 19 '13 at 14:10
2  
"Any synchronized block (or any volatile field) causes all memory to be sync'd" -- are you sure? Would you provide JLS reference to it? As far as I remember, the only guarantee is that the modifications to the memory performed before releasing a lock L1 are visible to threads after they acquire the same lock L1; with volatiles, all memory modifications before a volatile write to F1 are visible to a thread after a volatile read of the same field F1, which is very different from saying that all* memory is sync'd. It is not as simple as any thread running a synchronized block. –  Bruno Reis Jul 19 '13 at 14:14
1  
When any memory barrier is crossed (with synchronized or volatile) there is a "happens before" relationship for all memory. There is no guarantees about the order of the locks and synchronization unless you lock on the same monitor which is what you are referred to @BrunoReis. But if the println(...) completes, you are guaranteed that the keepRunning field is updated. –  Gray Jul 19 '13 at 14:28

Objects that are declared as volatile are usually used to communicate state information among threads,To ensure CPU caches are updated, that is, kept in sync, in the presence of volatile fields, a CPU instruction, a memory barrier, often called a membar or fence, is emitted to update CPU caches with a change in a volatile field’s value.

The volatile modifier tells the compiler that the variable modified by volatile can be changed unexpectedly by other parts of your program.

The volatile variable must be used in Thread Context only. see the example here

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I have modified your example slightly. Now use the example with keepRunning as volatile and non volatile member :

public class TestVolatile extends Thread{
 boolean keepRunning = true;

    public void run() {
        long count=0;
        while (keepRunning) {
            count++;
        }

        System.out.println("Thread terminated."+count);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
        TestVolatile t = new TestVolatile();
        t.start();
        Thread.sleep(1000);
        t.keepRunning = false;
        System.out.println("keepRunning set to false.");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1 for not explaining what will happen –  ComputerEngineer88 Apr 17 at 20:56

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