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I am using emacs I find that sometimes I have 2 files separated into 2 windows.

For example: I open 1 file using C-x C-f file1.c RET

and I split the frame into two windows: C-x 3

I then open another file C-x C-f file2.c RET

So I have 2 files:

window 1 (left) file1.c

window 2 (right) file2.c

I am wondering if there is any key combination to swap the files over? Normally I like to work on the left window when I have 2 window. I know I can easily do C-x oto move the cursor to the right window.

However, I am just wondering if I can swap the files so that file2.c is in the left window and file1.c is in the right window?

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5  
You're going to love my comment. Emacs has a specific meaning for frame and window. Specifically, an emacs frame is what Windows calls a window. An emacs window is what you call a frame. Please change frame to window :D –  Bahbar Nov 21 '09 at 8:11
2  
Edited to conform to Emacs terminology. –  Trey Jackson Nov 21 '09 at 17:26
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5 Answers

up vote 34 down vote accepted

I use buffer-move for this. Now if you are working on the buffer on the left side, calling 'buf-move-right' will swap it with the one on the right. I guess this is what you want.

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This solution is perfect, and the comments are very clear - just make sure you read them :) –  Martin Clarke Jun 9 '10 at 17:38
1  
If you just want to swap windows (independent on the selected one), you can use the following (defun win-swap () "Swap windows using buffer-move.el" (interactive) (if (null (windmove-find-other-window 'right)) (buf-move-left) (buf-move-right))) –  mefiX Nov 29 '10 at 12:00
    
buffer-move didn't work for me with the layout of just two windows but with win-swap it worked just fine, thanks! –  dolzenko Apr 2 '12 at 11:20
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The transpose-frame library provides a pretty comprehensive set of functions for flipping or rotating the window arrangements in frames.

M-x flop-frame RET does what this particular question needs.

The following diagrams are from the commentary in the library (and its EmacsWiki page):

‘transpose-frame’ … Swap x-direction and y-direction

       +------------+------------+      +----------------+--------+
       |            |     B      |      |        A       |        |
       |     A      +------------+      |                |        |
       |            |     C      |  =>  +--------+-------+   D    |
       +------------+------------+      |   B    |   C   |        |
       |            D            |      |        |       |        |
       +-------------------------+      +--------+-------+--------+

‘flip-frame’ … Flip vertically

       +------------+------------+      +------------+------------+
       |            |     B      |      |            D            |
       |     A      +------------+      +------------+------------+
       |            |     C      |  =>  |            |     C      |
       +------------+------------+      |     A      +------------+
       |            D            |      |            |     B      |
       +-------------------------+      +------------+------------+

‘flop-frame’ … Flop horizontally

       +------------+------------+      +------------+------------+
       |            |     B      |      |     B      |            |
       |     A      +------------+      +------------+     A      |
       |            |     C      |  =>  |     C      |            |
       +------------+------------+      +------------+------------+
       |            D            |      |            D            |
       +-------------------------+      +-------------------------+

‘rotate-frame’ … Rotate 180 degrees

       +------------+------------+      +-------------------------+
       |            |     B      |      |            D            |
       |     A      +------------+      +------------+------------+
       |            |     C      |  =>  |     C      |            |
       +------------+------------+      +------------+     A      |
       |            D            |      |     B      |            |
       +-------------------------+      +------------+------------+

‘rotate-frame-clockwise’ … Rotate 90 degrees clockwise

       +------------+------------+      +-------+-----------------+
       |            |     B      |      |       |        A        |
       |     A      +------------+      |       |                 |
       |            |     C      |  =>  |   D   +--------+--------+
       +------------+------------+      |       |   B    |   C    |
       |            D            |      |       |        |        |
       +-------------------------+      +-------+--------+--------+

‘rotate-frame-anti-clockwise’ … Rotate 90 degrees anti-clockwise

       +------------+------------+      +--------+--------+-------+
       |            |     B      |      |   B    |   C    |       |
       |     A      +------------+      |        |        |       |
       |            |     C      |  =>  +--------+--------+   D   |
       +------------+------------+      |        A        |       |
       |            D            |      |                 |       |
       +-------------------------+      +-----------------+-------+
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I'm not aware of any built-in function doing this.

However, it does not seem too difficult to whip up some elisp for doing it. Devil is in the details though.

(defun swap-buffers-in-windows ()
  "Put the buffer from the selected window in next window, and vice versa"
  (interactive)
  (let* ((this (selected-window))
     (other (next-window))
     (this-buffer (window-buffer this))
     (other-buffer (window-buffer other)))
    (set-window-buffer other this-buffer)
    (set-window-buffer this other-buffer)
    )
  )

Notably, this may not be doing what you desire with respect to where the caret ends up. However, you'd first have to say what you want :p

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I copied and pasted this code, and it doesn't seem to do anything. –  user181548 Nov 21 '09 at 8:48
    
Oh, sorry, it does do something, it swaps the top and bottom parts of the Emacs window. I was expecting it to swap the frames. –  user181548 Nov 21 '09 at 8:50
    
ok. You're confusing me. you mentioned C-x 3. This is to create 2 emacs windows, not 2 emacs frames. Are you using frames or windows ? What do you call windows and what do you call frames? –  Bahbar Nov 21 '09 at 8:54
    
also, you did not talk about top and bottom parts. Do you have more than 2 buffers showing at once ? –  Bahbar Nov 21 '09 at 8:55
    
I'm not the person who asked the question, I'm just an interloper. I had never used C-x 3 before I saw this question, but as you say it splits the Emacs window, rather than creating a new frame. –  user181548 Nov 21 '09 at 9:54
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I would contrive to open up file #2 in the desired location, i.e. after you hit c-x 3, move the cursor with c-x o before navigating to the second file.

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If you are using prelude you can just use "C-c s" (prelude-swap-windows)

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