Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am new to ASP.NET MVC and I am stuck on a point. I am working on a classified site. My situation is, I have a lot of categories in which a user can post their ads and each ad category have different View. I have created a Controller Action like

 public ActionResult PostAd(string CategoryName, string SubCategoryName)
 {
        if(categoryName == "Vehicle" && SubCategoryName == "Cars")
        {
             var model = new CarAdViewModel();

             // set CarAdViewModel properties...

             return View("CarAdCreateView", model);
        }
        else if(categoryName == "Vehicle" && SubCategoryName == "Bikes")
        {
            var model = new BikeAdViewModel();

             // set BikeAdViewModel properties...

             return View("BikeAdViewModel", model);
        }
        else if(categoryName == "Property" && SubCategoryName == "RentHouse")
        {
             var model = new RentHouseAdViewModel();

             // set RentHouseAdViewModel properties...

             return View("RentHouseAdViewModel", model);                 
        }
        else................... so on and so on
 }

My problem is I have huge number of Categories and Sub Categories almost 60+. And if I keep on coding like above for 60+ categories and subcategories, my PostAd method is going to blast and become unmanageable.

Please tell me some best practice or pattern which can bring me out of this problem.

share|improve this question
    
Are you absolutely sure you need a different view for each category? Why do you think so? –  Erik Funkenbusch Jul 19 '13 at 16:59
    
@MystereMan All my ads fields are different like CarAd has : BodyType, Make, Model, MechanicalCondition, etc and RentHouse has : NumberOfRooms, NumberofBathroom, IsFurnished, HasAttachedBath etc and so on. Tell me if there is any other way? –  Usman Khalid Jul 19 '13 at 17:06
    
Views and action methods need to change based on their logic, not necessarily based on the data or fields. You can render different fields in a view based on collection types.. You should look into EditorTemplates coding-in.net/asp-net-mvc-3-how-to-use-editortemplates –  Erik Funkenbusch Jul 19 '13 at 18:24
    
@MystereMan It's beautiful but how will it solve my problem? I have lots of ViewModels on base of Category and SubCategory. –  Usman Khalid Jul 19 '13 at 19:50
    
@MystereMan I don't think it's going to make my life less miserable as now I have to create different EditorTemplates instead of different Views. I think it's same amount of code. Also partial views can work like that as well. –  Usman Khalid Jul 19 '13 at 20:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, some of what you are doing cannot be avoided. There needs to be some form of model and view selection based on category.

Use a factory pattern. Create a base class:

public abstract class BaseCategory
{
  public abstract string GetViewName();
  public abstract Object CreateModelFromFormData();
}

For each category, create a sub-class derived from BaseCategory and implement the abstract functions.

In your action, do the following:

public ActionResult PostAd(string categoryName, string subCategoryName)
{
  BaseFactory factory;
  if (categoryName == "Vehicle")
  {
    if (subCategoryName == "Cars")
    {
      factory = new CarsFactory();
    }
    else ...
  }
  else ...

  return View(factory.GetViewName(), factory.CreateModelFromFormData());
}

I have a couple reasons for this schema:

  1. I am purposefully using if/else for the factory selection. Your controller is going to be created and re-created for every action call. So pre-populating a list will constantly and needlessly create objects for categories that will not be selected. A simple if/else will be more efficient. If you want to prevent the if/else, you can put your factories in a Dictionary and select based on the categories, but that would be a lot of needless constructor actions.

  2. I made the CreateModelFromFormData a function because I assume you'll need to copy data from the posted form data. This may require passing in data, but I left the function parameterless.

  3. I used base/derived classes because the copying of the form data will probably need to be custom from the model being created and the form data being posted. Also, saving to persistent storage (file or database) may be category-specific as well.

share|improve this answer

It would be one of some possible solutions

public class PostAdData
{
    public string CategoryName;
    public string SubCategoryName;
    public string ViewName;
    public Type Model;
}

public class PostController : Controller
{
    private readonly List<PostAdData> _theData;

    public HomeController()
    {
        _theData = InitializeData();
    }


    public ActionResult PostAd(string categoryName, string subCategoryName)
    {
        var data = _theData.FirstOrDefault(c => c.CategoryName == categoryName && c.SubCategoryName == subCategoryName);
        if (data != null)
        {
            var model = Activator.CreateInstance(data.Model);
            return View(data.ViewName, model);
        }
        return View("Error");
    }

    [NonAction]
    public List<PostAdData> InitializeData()
    {
        var result = new List<PostAdData>
                         {
                             new PostAdData
                                 {
                                     CategoryName = "Vehicle",
                                     SubCategoryName = "Cars",
                                     ViewName = "CarAdCreateView",
                                     Model = typeof (CarAdViewModel)
                                 }
                         };
        return result;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Make your _theData static and populated in a static constructor. Otherwise it will be populated and re-populated for every action call. –  Matt Houser Jul 19 '13 at 16:28
    
That's right. Thank you Matt –  Abbas Amiri Jul 19 '13 at 16:40
    
@MattHouser That's a good point. –  Usman Khalid Jul 19 '13 at 16:42

You should make this data driven. You create a lookup table that has a compound primary key of category and subcategory. Then it has a table with View in it. Then you simply ad rows for each category/subcategory/view combination.

If you absolutely don't want a database, then you can use a simple hashset or dictionary.

var views = new Dictionary<Tuple<string,string>,string>();

views.Add(new Tuple<string,string>("Vehicle", "Cars"), "CarAdCreateView");

Then in your PostAd you just lookup the correct view.

share|improve this answer
    
I will prefer database approach but I am lost what to do. –  Usman Khalid Jul 19 '13 at 20:21

What a beautiful solution on www.asp.net to my question, here is the link : http://forums.asp.net/t/1923868.aspx/1?ASP+NET+MVC+Conditional+ViewModel+Abstraction

Edit:

My code is :

public class AdsController : Controller
{
     private readonly IAdService _adService;
     public AdsController(IAdService adService)
     {
         _adService = adService;
     }

     public ActionResult PostAd(string Category, string SubCategory)
    {
        //Here I will call
        var strategy = GetStrategy(CategoryName, SubCategoryName);
        strategy.FillModel(_adService );
        return View(strategy.ViewName, strategy.Model);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The problem with this approach is that it will create objects on every action call looking for the appropriate class. Infact, I suspect performance will be even worse than @abbas-amiri's approach because of the extra "search for classes" that it will do. Yes it's beautiful, but you'll take a performance hit for it. If you are going to stay with this solution, then at least "discover" the classes once and cache them. –  Matt Houser Jul 22 '13 at 13:50
    
I understand that I will lose some performance with GetStrategy() method but why it will create these objects on every action call? –  Usman Khalid Jul 23 '13 at 5:05
1  
As part of GetStrategy, hidden in the LINQ statement is Activator.CreateInstance which will create an instance of the objects it finds, then compare your desired categories against the categories held inside that object. Those objects are created, compared then destroy (if it's not the correct one). You call GetStrategy for every PostAd call, so it will create, compare and destroy many objects for every PostAd. –  Matt Houser Jul 23 '13 at 15:05
    
Ok now I got it. Thanks :) –  Usman Khalid Jul 24 '13 at 4:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.