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Consider Following code from Java Puzzlers

class Gloam<T>{

String glom(Collection<?> objs ) {
    System.out.println("collection");
    String result = "";
    for (Object o : objs ){
        result += o;
    }
    return result;
}

int glom(List <Integer> ints ) {
    System.out.println("List");
    int result = 0;
    for ( int i : ints )
        result += i ;
    return result;
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    List<String> strings = Arrays.asList("1", "2", "3");
    System.out.println(new Gloam().glom(strings));
}

}

When I run this program it gives class cast exception, But if I provide any Generic argument for Gloam class in main method it works fine.

public static void main(String[] args) {
    List<String> strings = Arrays.asList("1", "2", "3");
    System.out.println(new Gloam<Date>().glom(strings));
}

I don't understand how generic works in class type parameter ?

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marked as duplicate by Paul Bellora, Raedwald, Hong Ooi, the paul, Steve P. Jul 20 '13 at 6:00

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
What Java version? –  Alexander Pogrebnyak Jul 19 '13 at 15:27
    
That's right, i'm pretty sure it's related to type erasure. docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/generics/erasure.html –  Sadbrute Jul 19 '13 at 15:39
    
@AlexanderPogrebnyak Java 1.6 –  Punit Patel Jul 22 '13 at 7:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

With no generic type passed into constructor, all types are erased and the compiler is presented with this choices

String glom ( Collection );

int glom ( List );

The type is also erased from strings variable defined in main, so its type is List.

Because List is more specific than Collection it chooses int glom ( List ).

Now, if you have specified the generic parameter, then no type erasure happens, and compiler knows that it cannot match int glom ( List<Integer> ) to List<String>, so it falls back to String glom ( Collection<?> )

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Once you fail to provide the generic type parameter, all generic typing for the whole class is gone in the eyes of the compiler. The class essentially becomes:

class Gloam<T> {

  String glom(Collection objs) {
    System.out.println("collection");
    String result = "";
    for (Object o : objs) {
      result += o;
    }
    return result;
  }

  int glom(List ints) {
    System.out.println("List");
    int result = 0;
    for (int i : ints)
      result += i;
    return result;
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    List strings = Arrays.asList("1", "2", "3");
    System.out.println(new Gloam().glom(strings));
  }

}

So now the compiler will choose the int glom(List ints) override since that's the most-specific override that matches the call. But it will also result in the class cast exception. When you supply the generic parameter, generics are retained and the String glom(Collection<?> objs ) override matches the call (which is passing a List<String>), whereas int glom(List <Integer> ints ) does not match because String is not Integer.

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You can use generic to distinguish the method in Java. The JVM doesn't see this type however provided the argument or return type is different it will still compile in the Sun/Oracle compiler. This doesn't compile for the IBM/eclipse compiler.

This shows you want is happening at the byte code level.

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Both examples compile just fine in Eclipse Kepler. –  Alexander Pogrebnyak Jul 19 '13 at 15:36

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