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Suppose I have the following constants:

const char EASY = 'E';
const char NORMAL = 'N';
const char HARD = 'H';
const char LUNATIC = 'L';

I want LUNATIC to be greater than HARD, which is greater than NORMAL, which is greater than EASY.

How do I define them as such where the following will work:

int main(){
    char diff1 = LUNATIC;
    char diff2 = NORMAL;

    if (diff1 > diff2){
        printf("Lunatic is harder than normal");
    }
    return 0;
}
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12  
One word: enum –  Kevin Jul 19 '13 at 15:22
5  
enum { EASY, NORMAL, HARD, LUNATIC }; –  user529758 Jul 19 '13 at 15:22
1  
When you have constants you usually know the relation between them. Why would you check for equality between them? –  Maroun Maroun Jul 19 '13 at 15:25
    
And now I feel very silly that I forgot about enum. Thanks. –  LChaos2 Jul 19 '13 at 15:26
1  
@EdwardBird C DOESN'T support operator overloading. –  Maroun Maroun Jul 19 '13 at 15:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use enumeration:

enum Difficulty
{
    EASY,
    NORMAL,
    HARD,
    LUNATIC
};

int main(){
    char diff1 = LUNATIC;
    char diff2 = NORMAL;

    if (diff1 > diff2){
        printf("Lunatic is harder than normal");
    }
    return 0;
}
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1  
Now I'm also able to understand, what does enum means and how does it work. Even in the name of @LChaos2, thank you! –  Zoltán Schmidt Jul 19 '13 at 17:05

Use enum { EASY, NORMAL, HARD, LUNATIC }; instead of your constant definitions and your code would start to work.

But, one thing that I am unable to understand is your need to compare the constants. You know the values as they are compile time constants!

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There's several ways. The cleaner solution is to use enumerators, which are guaranteed to have increasing integral values:

typedef enum Difficulty {
    Easy,
    Normal,
    Hard,
    Lunatic
} Difficulty;

This can be used like this:

void foo(Difficulty a, Difficulty b)
{
    if (a > b) {
        // ...
    } else
    // ...
}

// ...

Difficulty a = Easy;
Difficulty b = Hard;
foo(a, b);

Other approaches are possible too. You can just use macros with increasing values:

#define EASY 0
#define NORMAL 1
#define HARD 2
#define LUNATIC 3

Your current approach works too, but there's no reason for you to use actual characters for the constants. You can just use numeric values instead:

const char EASY = 0;
const char NORMAL = 1;
const char HARD = 2;
const char LUNATIC = 3;

And of course there's no real reason as far as I can see that would require you to use char constants. You can just use int instead.

The first approach (using an enumerator) is usually preferred, as it gives you an actual typedef that you can use, which helps make code a bit more readable; if you see a variable of type Difficulty, then you immediately know what kind of values it's expected to hold.

One thing to keep in mind with enumerators is that they're compatible with integers. That means they don't really give you any type safety since you can assign any numerical value to them; it's mostly about writing cleaner code, not type safety.

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