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If I try this

float f = (float)numeric_limits<double>::infinity();

Or indeed, try to cast anything bigger than float max down to a float, am I guaranteed to end up with infinity?

It works on GCC, but is it a standard though?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

float f = (float)numeric_limits<double>::infinity();

This is guaranteed to set f to infinity if your compilation platform offers IEEE 754 arithmetic for floating-point computations (it usually does).

Or indeed, try to cast anything bigger than float max down to a float, am I guaranteed to end up with infinity?

No. In the default IEEE 754 round-to-nearest mode, a few double values above the maximum finite float (that is, FLT_MAX) convert to FLT_MAX. The exact limit is the number midway between FLT_MAX (0x1.fffffep127 in C99 hexadecimal representation) and the next float number that could be represented if the exponent in the single-precision format had a larger range, 0x2.0p128. The limit is thus 0x1.ffffffp127 or approximately 3.4028235677973366e+38 in decimal.

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In round-to-nearest mode with IEEE 754 arithmetic (which are common). –  Eric Postpischil Jul 19 '13 at 16:44
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In the parlance of this answer, a “few” is 536 million, 870 thousand, 911. –  Eric Postpischil Jul 19 '13 at 17:35

From the C++11 standard, §4.8.1:

A prvalue of floating point type can be converted to a prvalue of another floating point type. If the source value can be exactly represented in the destination type, the result of the conversion is that exact representation. If the source value is between two adjacent destination values, the result of the conversion is an implementation-defined choice of either of those values. Otherwise, the behavior is undefined.

This implies that

  • If you cast double infinity to float, you get float infinity.

  • If you cast a double value, that lies between float max and infinity, to float, then you get float max or float infinity.

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The first part of the question is about infinity, which can be exactly represented in the destination type, no? –  Pascal Cuoq Jul 19 '13 at 16:36
    
@Pascal Cuoq: I have revised the answer. –  user763305 Jul 19 '13 at 16:41
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@user763305 That's an interesting interpretation; I'd never thought of it, but you're right: values greater than FLT_MAX are between FLT_MAX and Inf, so the behavior is well defined by the standard. (Even if it weren't, of course, it's defined by IEEE.) –  James Kanze Jul 19 '13 at 17:12

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