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This is essentially what I'm doing to run an asynchronous method synchronously:

This essentially works when called once, but when called multiple times, it will eventually stay inside the while loop and never get signaled. Any ideas on how to set a timer to eventually time out after sometime?

__block SomeClass *result = nil;

dispatch_semaphore_t semaphore = dispatch_semaphore_create(0);
dispatch_queue_t queue = dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_LOW, 0UL);
dispatch_async(queue, ^{
    [[SomeManager sharedInstance] someMethodWithCallback:^(id responseObject, NSError *error) {
        if (!error) {
            result = (SomeClass *)ResponseObject;
        }

        dispatch_semaphore_signal(semaphore);
    }];
});

// wait with a time limit
while (dispatch_semaphore_wait(semaphore, DISPATCH_TIME_NOW)) {
    [[NSRunLoop currentRunLoop] runMode:NSDefaultRunLoopMode beforeDate:[NSDate dateWithTimeIntervalSinceNow:0]];
}

dispatch_release(semaphore);

Thanks

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It seems, you still need to "get a grasp" how asynchronous patterns work. From my own experience, I know that can take a while ;) –  CouchDeveloper Jul 19 '13 at 17:36
    
CouchDeveloper, likewise for yourself: stackoverflow.com/questions/818674/… –  Brian Liang Jul 19 '13 at 17:45
    
This is actually an excellent answer when you write unit tests with asynchronous methods. –  CouchDeveloper Jul 19 '13 at 17:49
    
Exactly my case. –  Brian Liang Jul 19 '13 at 17:52
    
Oh, then you can use your approach in unit tests. It's just not favorable to use it in production code. Just ensure, the semaphore will be either a) created every time, or b) signaled after it has been used once. (Nonetheless, any asynchronous operation should be cancelable) –  CouchDeveloper Jul 19 '13 at 17:57

3 Answers 3

That looks kind of like GCD abuse to me. ;) Are you running the run loop because this is executing on the main thread? Why not just use a dispatch_async() from your completion handler to invoke a handler on the main thread? eg:

- (void)handleDataReady: (id) results error: (NSError *) error {
    // update your app
}

- (void)performAsyncUpdate {
    dispatch_queue_t queue = dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_LOW, 0UL);
    dispatch_async(queue, ^{
        [[SomeManager sharedInstance] someMethodWithCallback:^(id responseObject, NSError *error) {
            dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
                [self handleDataReady:responseObject error:error];
        }];
    });
}
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If you really want to make it synchronous, i.e. blocking the calling thread until the operation completes then use the following pattern (of course you want to avoid blocking threads if possible)

NSCondition *waitCondtion = [NSCondition new];
__block BOOL completed = NO;

dispatch_queue_t queue = dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_LOW, 0UL);
dispatch_async(queue, ^{
    [[SomeManager sharedInstance] someMethodWithCallback:^(id responseObject, NSError     *error) {
        if (!error) {
            result = (SomeClass *)ResponseObject;
        }

       [waitCondtion lock];
       completed = YES;
       [waitCondition signal];
       [waitCondition unlock];
    }];
});

[waitCondtion lock];
if (!completed)
    [waitCondtion wait];
[waitCondition unlock];

You can also use "waitUntilDate:" to timeout the wait after a period.

However, this pattern only works as long as the "someMethodWithCallback does not call its callback block on the same thread that is being blocked. I have copied your code because it is not obvious how "someMethodWithCallback" is implemented. Since this method is using an asynchronous pattern, then it must be doing something asynchronously therefore why are you calling it inside a dispatch_async? What thread will it call its callback block on?

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You should "fill" the completion handler with whatever code you require to process the result when the completion handler finished (and also completely removing that run loop).

In order to "abort" an asynchronous operation, you should provide a cancel message which you send the asynchronous result provider.

In your case, since you have a singleton, the cancel message would have to be send like this:

 [[SomeManager sharedInstance] cancel];

When the operation receives the cancel message, it should as soon as possible abort its task and call the completion handler with an appropriate NSError object indicating that it has been cancelled.

Note, that cancel messages may be asynchronous - that means, when it returns, the receiver may still execute the task.

You may achieve a "timeout" with setting up a timer, which sends the cancel message the operation, unless it has been invalidated when the operation finished.

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