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Scala's literal identifiers are described in Need clarification on Scala literal identifiers (backticks).

Background: I'm converting an Ant build system to Gradle. We currently have a file dependencies.properties with definitions like:

com.netflix.archaius.archaius-core.rev=latest.release

But Groovy doesn't like the . and - in the property names (since they're operators). Rather than changing the names of the properties and everything using them, is there a way to tell Groovy to consider the . and - as simply another character in the property name?

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Could this doc and this discussion help? You can very well use GString implementations where you see -. For eg: com.netflix.archaius.'archaius-core'.rev=${latest.release} –  dmahapatro Jul 19 '13 at 17:45
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Why aren't you just parsing the properties file as a properties file, and, if necessary, do some simple string replacement on the resulting map? –  Peter Niederwieser Jul 19 '13 at 20:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The following does not provide literal identifiers, as in Scala, but it should solve your root problem. Given this dependencies.properties file:

foo=bar
com.netflix.archaius.archaius-core.rev=latest.release

and then this Gradle script:

ant.property(file: "dependencies.properties")

task go() {
    println ant."com.netflix.archaius.archaius-core.rev"
    println ant.foo
    println "done."
}

the output is (edited for brevity):

bash-3.2$ gradle go
latest.release
bar
done.

BUILD SUCCESSFUL

Total time: 4.26 secs
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In our build, the properties get put in the project scope so either project.'com.netflix.archaius.archaius-core.rev' or project[''com.netflix.archaius.archaius-core.rev'] works. –  Noel Yap Jul 22 '13 at 17:35

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