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What are people's strategies for maximizing test coverage while minimizing test duplication and overlap, particularly between unit tests and functional or integration tests? The issue is not specific to any particular language or framework, but just as an example, say you have a Rails app that allows users to post comments. You might have a User model that looks something like this:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  def post_comment(attributes)
    comment = self.comments.create(attributes)
    notify_friends('created', comment)
    share_on_facebook('created', comment)
    share_on_twitter('created', comment)
    award_badge('first_comment') unless self.comments.size > 1
  end

  def notify_friends(action, object)
    friends.each do |f|
      f.notifications.create(subject: self, action: action, object: object)
    end
  end

  def share_on_facebook(action, object)
    FacebookClient.new.share(subject: self, action: action, object: object)
  end

  def share_on_twitter(action, object)
    TwitterClient.new.share(subject: self, action: action, object: object)
  end

  def award_badge(badge_name)
    self.badges.create(name: badge_name)
  end
end

As an aside, I would actually use service objects rather put this type of application logic in models, but I wrote the example this way just to keep it simple.

Anyway, unit testing the post_comment method is pretty straightforward. You would write tests to assert that:

  • The comment gets created with the given attributes
  • The user's friends receive notifications about the user creating the comment
  • The share method is called on instance of FacebookClient, with the expected hash of params
  • Ditto for TwitterClient
  • The user gets the 'first_comment' badge when this is the user's first comment
  • The user doesn't get the 'first_comment' badge when he/she has previous comments

But then how do you write your functional and/or integration tests to ensure the controller actually invokes this logic and produces the desired results in all of the different scenarios?

One approach is just to reproduce all of the unit test cases in the functional and integration tests. This achieves good test coverage but makes the tests extremely burdensome to write and maintain, especially when you have more complex logic. This does not seem like a viable approach for even a moderately complex application.

Another approach is to just test that the controller invokes the post_comment method on the user with the expected params. Then you can rely on the unit test of post_comment to cover all of the relevant test cases and verify the results. This seems like an easier way to achieve the desired coverage, but now your tests are coupled with the specific implementation of the underlying code. Say you find that your models have gotten bloated and difficult to maintain and you refactor all of this logic into a service object like this:

class PostCommentService
  attr_accessor :user, :comment_attributes
  attr_reader :comment

  def initialize(user, comment_attributes)
    @user = user
    @comment_attributes = comment_attributes
  end

  def post
    @comment = self.user.comments.create(self.comment_attributes)
    notify_friends('created', comment)
    share_on_facebook('created', comment)
    share_on_twitter('created', comment)
    award_badge('first_comment') unless self.comments.size > 1
  end

  private

  def notify_friends(action, object)
    self.user.friends.each do |f|
      f.notifications.create(subject: self.user, action: action, object: object)
    end
  end

  def share_on_facebook(action, object)
    FacebookClient.new.share(subject: self.user, action: action, object: object)
  end

  def share_on_twitter(action, object)
    TwitterClient.new.share(subject: self.user, action: action, object: object)
  end

  def award_badge(badge_name)
    self.user.badges.create(name: badge_name)
  end
end

Maybe the actions like notifying friends, sharing on twitter, etc. would logically be refactored into their own service objects too. Regardless of how or why you refactor, your functional or integration test would now need to be rewritten if it was previously expecting the controller to call post_comment on the User object. Also, these types of assertions can get pretty unwieldy. In the case of this particular refactoring, you would now have to assert that the PostCommentService constructor is invoked with the appropriate User object and comment attributes, and then assert that the post method is invoked on the returned object. This gets messy.

Also, your test output is a lot less useful as documentation if the functional and integration tests describe implementation rather than behavior. For example, the following test (using Rspec) is not that helpful:

it "creates a PostCommentService object and executes the post method on it" do
  ...
end

I would much rather have tests like this:

it "creates a comment with the given attributes" do
  ...
end

it "creates notifications for the user's friends" do
  ...
end

How do people solve this problem? Is there another approach that I'm not considering? Am I going overboard in trying to achieve complete code coverage?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Bare with me, I'm talking from a .Net/C# perspective here, but I think its generally applicable...

To me a unit test just tests the object under test, and not any of the dependencies. The class is tested to make sure it communicates correctly with any dependencies using Mock objects to verify the appropriate calls are made, and it handles returned objects in the correct manner (in other words the class under test is isolated). In the example above, this would mean mocking the facebook/twitter interfaces, and checking communication with the interface, not the actual api calls themselves.

It looks like in your original unit test example above you are talking about testing all of the logic (i.e. Post to facebook, twitter etc...) in the same tests. I would say if these tests are written in this way, its actually a functional test already. Now if you absolutely cannot modify the class under test at all, writing a unit test at this point would be unnecessary duplication. But if you can modify the class under test, refactoring out so dependencies are behind interfaces, you could have a set of unit tests for each individual object, and a smaller set of functional tests that test the whole system together appears to behave correctly.

I know you said regardless of how they are refactored above, but to me, refactoring and TDD go hand in hand together. To try to do TDD or unit testing without refactoring is an unnecessarily painful experience, and leads to a more difficult design to change, and maintain.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your response. Are the first tests that I described really not unit tests? They're testing behavior of the post_command method. In the case of the two external dependencies (Facebook and Twitter), I mentioned just testing that instances of FacebookClient and TwitterClient receive the share method with the expected hashes of attributes. When it comes to testing the controller, do you then recommend just testing that the expected methods are invoked on the expected objects (or mocks) with the expected arguments (the second testing approach that I mentioned)? –  Chris Heydt Jul 25 '13 at 15:20
    
@ChrisHeydt Having re-read your question, they are probably unit tests, as long as the test for Post_comment is isolated from twitter client, friend and facebook client implementations (This may be a purist viewpoint). I guess a unit test on the controller would be worth it too, to check that it does call post comment when it should. –  grrrrrrrrrrrrr Jul 25 '13 at 19:33
    
@ChrisHeydt The higher level functional tests (these are the ones I have less experience with) to my understanding should test a slice of the complete functionality with all of the objects working together. e.g. WhenPostingACommentTheCommentIsSharedOnFacebook. These could be invoked at the highest level you can, and if possible actually use the external source you are integrating with (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, RDBMS etc..) if possible to verify the correct behavior was achieved. The book Growing Object Oriented Software Guided by tests describes this type of approach test first. –  grrrrrrrrrrrrr Jul 25 '13 at 19:36

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