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I'm new to using perl and I'm trying to build a hash of a hash from a tsv. My current process is to read in a file and construct a hash and then insert it into another hash.

   my %hoh = ();
   while (my $line = <$tsv>) 
   {
      chomp $line;
      my %hash;
      my @data = split "\t", $line;

      my $id;
      my $iter = each_array(@columns, @data);

      while(my($k, $v) = $iter->())
      {
         $hash{$k} = $v;
         if($k eq 'Id')
         {
            $id = $v;   
         }
      }

      $hoh{$id} = %hash;
   }
   print "dump: ", Dumper(%hoh);

This outputs:

dump
$VAR1 = '1234567890';
$VAR2 = '17/32';
$VAR3 = '1234567891';
$VAR4 = '17/32';
.....

Instead of what I would expect:

dump
{
   '1234567890' => { 
                    'k1' => 'v1',
                    'k2' => 'v2',
                    'k3' => 'v3',
                    'k4' => 'v4',
                    'id' => '1234567890'
                   },
   '1234567891' => { 
                    'k1' => 'v1',
                    'k2' => 'v2',
                    'k3' => 'v3',
                    'k4' => 'v4',
                    'id' => '1234567891'
                   },
     ........
};

My limited understanding is that when I do $hoh{$id} = %hash; its inserting in a reference to %hash? What am I doing wrong? Also is there a more succint way to use my columns and data array's as key,value pairs into my %hash object?

-Thanks in advance, Niru

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To get a reference, you have to use \:

$hoh{$id} = \%hash;

%hash is the hash, not the reference to it. In scalar context, it returns the string X/Y wre X is the number of used buckets and Y the number of all the buckets in the hash (i.e. nothing useful).

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You'd also have to pass a reference when calling Dumper. –  cjm Jul 19 '13 at 21:06
    
Thanks, this fixed my issue. –  Niru Jul 19 '13 at 22:10

To get a reference to a hash variable, you need to use \%hash (as choroba said).

A more succinct way to assign values to columns is to assign to a hash slice, like this:

my %hoh = ();
while (my $line = <$tsv>) 
{
   chomp $line;
   my %hash;
   @hash{@columns} = split "\t", $line;
   $hoh{$hash{Id}} = \%hash;
}
print "dump: ", Dumper(\%hoh);

A hash slice (@hash{@columns}) means essentially the same thing as ($hash{$columns[0]}, $hash{$columns[1]}, $hash{$columns[2]}, ...) up to however many columns you have. By assigning to it, I'm assigning the first value from split to $hash{$columns[0]}, the second value to $hash{$columns[1]}, and so on. It does exactly the same thing as your while ... $iter loop, just without the explicit loop (and it doesn't extract the $id).

There's no need to compare each $k to 'Id' inside a loop; just store it in the hash as a normal field and extract it afterwards with $hash{Id}. (Aside: Is your column header Id or id? You use Id in your loop, but id in your expected output.)

If you don't want to keep the Id field in the individual entries, you could use delete (which removes the key from the hash and returns the value):

$hoh{delete $hash{Id}} = \%hash;
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry a little confused by how this works. What goes on with: @hash{@columns}. So convert %hash to an array and for each value in column iterate over the result of the split and sequentially insert into @hash? also what happens here: $hoh{$hash{Id}} = \%hash; How does it know to find the value for the id column i.ie 1234567890 and use that as the key for hoh? –  Niru Jul 19 '13 at 22:08
    
Read the documentation on hash slices I linked to. @hash{@columns} is like ($hash{$columns[0]}, $hash{$columns[1]}, $hash{$columns[2]}, ...). It's not turning %hash into an array, it's just using the array sigil. –  cjm Jul 20 '13 at 6:19
    
It knows how to find the id column because that's in $hash{Id}, which I use as the key when assigning the hashref to $hoh{ $hash{Id} }. –  cjm Jul 20 '13 at 6:26
    
I see, I think I understand now. I did not notice the link in your post before, but reading it made more sense. Thanks for the help. –  Niru Jul 22 '13 at 17:20

Take a look at the documentation included in Perl. The command perldoc is very helpful. You can also look at the Perldoc webpage too.

One of the tutorials is a tutorial on Perl references. It all help clarify a lot of your questions and explain about referencing and dereferencing.

I also recommend that you look at CPAN. This is an archive of various Perl modules that can do many various tasks. Look at Text::CSV. This module will do exactly what you want, and even though it says "CSV", it works with tab separated files too.

You missed putting a slash in front of your hash you're trying to make a reference. You have:

$hoh{$id} = %hash;

Probably want:

$hoh{$id} = \%hash;

also, when you do a Data::Dumper of a hash, you should do it on a reference to a hash. Internally, hashes and arrays have similar structures when a Data::Dumper dump is done.

You have:

 print "dump: ", Dumper(%hoh);

You should have:

 print "dump: ", Dumper( \%hoh );

My attempt at the program:

#! /usr/bin/env perl
#
use warnings;
use strict;
use autodie;
use feature qw(say);
use Data::Dumper;

use constant {
    FILE    => "test.txt",
};

open my $fh, "<", FILE;

#
# First line with headers
#

my $line = <$fh>;
chomp $line;
my @headers = split /\t/, $line;
my %hash_of_hashes;

#
# Rest of file
#
while ( my $line = <$fh> ) {
    chomp $line;
    my %line_hash;
    my @values = split /\t/, $line;
    for my $index ( ( 0..$#values ) ) {
        $line_hash{ $headers[$index] } = $values[ $index ];
    }
    $hash_of_hashes{ $line_hash{id} } = \%line_hash;
}

say Dumper \%hash_of_hashes;
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, I did not know that CSV handles TSV as well, I didn't want to do manual convert step in between getting and opening the file. Thanks. –  Niru Jul 19 '13 at 22:10
    
Unless you've got quotes in your TSV (which is uncommon), Text::CSV is overkill for parsing TSV. split works just fine for that. –  cjm Jul 20 '13 at 6:29
    
@cjm Look at my code that doesn't use Text::CSV. I have to read in my header, then match my header against each line, so I can build a hash. Text::CSV handles that for me. My code will fail if one line has more fields than another. I can handle it with Text::CSV. Text::CSV handles everything for me, and makes my programming job easier. The hardest thing about Text::CSV is it's incomplete documentation, and the fact it's not a standard module, so it may not be available for you to use. –  David W. Jul 22 '13 at 0:41

You should only store a reference to a variable if you do so in the last line before the variable goes go of scope. In your script, you declare %hash inside the while loop, so placing this statement as the last in the loop is safe:

$hoh{$id} = \%hash;

If it's not the last statement (or you're not sure it's safe), create an anonymous structure to hold the contents of the variable:

$hoh{$id} = { %hash };

This makes a copy of %hash, which is slower, but any subsequent changes to it will not effect what you stored.

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