Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am attempting to make a WPF application. The application needs to use a "list view" to show results of queries to the database. I have been able to successfully create the application (GUI, database, LINQ, etc.), however, the display of my query results appear more "gridlike".

The specifications for the project below show that each record that appears in the results needs to have a green circle icon next to it. I have removed the actual results from the images below to keep the contents of the database private.

I don't have enough Reputation Points to post images, so I posted pictures so a sample/testing domain that I use. You can see screenshots here of the WPF app and code here:

http://digitalworkzone.com/WPF.html

What am I doing incorrectly? Is there something I need to add or modify to my code to be able to get the green circles and more of a "list" style to display my query results?

share|improve this question
    
I believe you may need to look into the row header template and customize it with your icon with an <image> tag –  Alan Jul 19 '13 at 20:17
    
Was this issue resolved? If so, please accept an answer. –  Luke Willis Jul 22 '13 at 14:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Understand the WPF content model. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb613548.aspx

Anything that has a 'Content' property basically behaves in two ways. If the 'Content' is set to something that derives from UIElement, then the class will manage it's own presentation. Anything else, however, will just get .ToString() called, and it's text displayed instead.

What this means in the long run is that everything in WPF can display anything. If you want to show a button in a button, you can. For example:

<Button>
    <Button.Content>
        <Button Content="This will show as text" />
    </Button.Content>
</Button>

The inner button will have text, but the outer button will show a Button because Button derives from UIElement and therefore will handle its own presentation.

In your picture examples above, you have ListBoxes/DataGrids that you want to fill in with graphical information. Try this out:

<ListBox HorizontalContentAlignment="Stretch">
    <ListBox.Items>
        <Button Content="One"/>
        <Button Content="Two"/>
        <Button Content="Three"/>
        <Button Content="Four"/>
    </ListBox.Items>
</ListBox>

Now you have a ListBox that shows Buttons instead of Text. You can take this a step further and contain the items in a stackpanel, for example:

<ListBox HorizontalContentAlignment="Stretch">
    <ListBox.Items>
        <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal">
            <Button Content="A button"/>
            <Label Content="Some text" />
        </StackPanel>
        <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal">
            <Button Content="A button"/>
            <Label Content="Some text" />
        </StackPanel>
        <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal">
            <Button Content="A button"/>
            <Label Content="Some text" />
        </StackPanel>
    </ListBox.Items>
</ListBox>

Now we have items that contain a layout container (StackPanels, which then contains other elements).

However, if you set the ItemsSource elsewhere, you can actually use a DataTemplate to display the contents. A DataTemplate in effect targets a particular class and lays out it's contents as defined in XAML. Consider:

Code Behind:

public partial class MyWindow : UserControl {
    public MyWindow() {
        InitializeComponent();

        MyListBox.ItemsSource = new List<Person> {
            new Person("Sam", "Smith"),
            new Person("Jim", "Henson"),
            new Person("Betty", "White"),
        };

    }

XAML:

    <ListBox HorizontalContentAlignment="Stretch" x:Name="MyListBox" >
        <ListBox.ItemTemplate>
            <DataTemplate>
                <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal" >
                    <Label Content="{Binding FirstName}"/>
                    <Label Content="{Binding LastName}"/>
                </StackPanel>
            </DataTemplate>
        </ListBox.ItemTemplate>
    </ListBox>

Now when the Listbox displays, it will cycle through each of the items in the ItemsSource property, and then lay them out using the DataTemplate. It's possible to have the DataTemplate target specific classes by using the DataType property if you're using polymorphism (as in different types of people such as 'Cusomters' or 'Employees' which all derive from 'Person).

The problem with this approach is that you are setting the value of the items directly, which is bad form. It's better to define a class that handles all of the data for your view separately. Consider:

public class ViewModel {

    // WPF will automatically read these properties using reflection.
    public List<Person> People {
        get {
            return new List<Person> {
                new Person("Sam", "Smith"),
                new Person("Jim", "Henson"),
                new Person("Betty", "White")
            };
        }
    }
}

That will hold all the data for the view, now let's add it to the actual window. First we need to reference the namespace ('xmlns' means xml namespace):

<Window x:Class="Sharp.MyWindow"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006" 
    xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008" 

    xmlns:lol="clr-namespace:Sharp">

The namespace is Sharp (the namespace where my stuff lives), and the alias we'll give it is lol. Now we attach our ViewModel class to the window by setting it to the DataContext property, as in:

<Window>
    <Window.DataContext>
        <lol:ViewModel />
    </Window.DataContext>
</Window>

This makes all of the public properties on the ViewModel class available to the Window. This way, if we want to read the Persons information into our ListBox, we simply say:

<ListBox HorizontalContentAlignment="Stretch" ItemsSource="{Binding People}" >
   ...
</ListBox>

Notice that we say ItemsSource={Binding People}, which means 'scan the ViewModel for any public properties called 'People' and then retrieve those results. This is essentially the fundamentals behind the MVVM approach. You might have all of your business logic in one or many classes which handle the main application operation in a Model, but then you have a ViewModel which interacts with the Model and exposes the results as public properties. WPF automatically binds to those properties and presents them for your. The information just flows, rather than setting the values by force.

To really understand how WPF is supposed to work, you should take some time to understand the basics of MVVM. WPF was really designed with MVVM in mind, and so to really get how WPF is supposed to work, you really should take the time to get your head around it. Take a look at: http://agilewarrior.wordpress.com/2011/01/11/simple-mvvm-walkthrough-part-i/ .

share|improve this answer
<ListBox ItemsSource="{Binding QueryResults}">
  <ListBox.ItemsTemplate>
    <DataTemplate>
      <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal">
        <Image Source="{Binding ImageSource}"/>
        <TextBlock Text="{Binding TextSource}"/>
      </StackPanel>
    </DataTemplate>
  </ListBox.ItemsTemplate>
</ListBox>

Will work if you have a list of objects named QueryResults in your code behind. Each object needs to have an string property named ImageSource and a string property named TextSource.

However, since you only need to display a green circle icon for each of the items, you can hardcode the image source. The above will work if you want to have a different icon for each, though.

Also note that in order for this to work, you need to set the DataContext of the window to DataContext="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}}"

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.