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I just started programming, and I want to use WinForms to make multiple buttons that you can click on to change from white to lime-green and back to white. I have done this for one button:

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (button1.BackColor != Color.Lime)
        {
            button1.BackColor = Color.Lime;
        }
        else
        {
            button1.BackColor = Color.White;
        }
    }

Now I could copy and paste that for all of the buttons, but I know that is inefficient; and if I use winforms to reference button1 on button2, it will just change the color of button1 (obviously).

So, do I need to use a helper method, new class, or something else? What would that look like?

I appreciate any help that anyone can give. Remember, I am a beginner so please speak loudly and slowly :).

Thanks.

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13  
Props to you for not wanting to take the easy way out and cut and paste a lot of code. You are already thinking about things the right way. –  Bill Gregg Jul 19 '13 at 20:25
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8 Answers

up vote 23 down vote accepted

There are a couple of approaches. One might be to create a common function which the different buttons call:

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    ChangeColor(button1);
}

private void ChangeColor(Button button)
{
    if (button.BackColor != Color.Lime)
        button.BackColor = Color.Lime;
    else
        button.BackColor = Color.White;
}

Then each button handler can use that same function call.

Or, if all of these buttons will always ever do exactly the same thing, then you can use one click handler function for all of them. In this case what you'd need to do is determine which button invoked the handler (whereas you're currently referencing button1 directly) so that you know which one to change. The sender object passed into the handler function is actually a reference to the form element which invoked the handler. All you need to do is cast it:

private void button_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    var button = (Button)sender;
    if (button.BackColor != Color.Lime)
        button.BackColor = Color.Lime;
    else
        button.BackColor = Color.White;
}

So first the handler grabs a reference to the button which invoked it, then runs the logic on that button. Note also how I made the name of the handler function slightly more generic. Now you'd go to the form designer and set button_Click as the click handler for all of the buttons which should invoke this.

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This is exactly what I was looking for. Thank you all for your help, explanations, and kind words. –  user2600871 Jul 19 '13 at 23:57
    
+1 Great answer; very well-explained. –  Brian Rogers Aug 2 '13 at 22:55
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You do this the exact same way you'd do it for any C# class. You derive your own class and customize the base class behavior. Every event has a corresponding OnXxxx() method that you can override.

Add a new class to your project and paste this code:

using System;
using System.Windows.Forms;

class MyButton : Button {
    protected override void OnClick(EventArgs e) {
        // Your code here
        //...
        base.OnClick(e);
    }
}

Change the code in OnClick() to do what you want to do. Compile. You'll now have your own button control on the top of the toolbox. And can drop as many copies of it as you want on a form. They'll all behave the same without having to add any code in the form.

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I don't see why this is a superior method to using a common method or shared event handler. If the button truly does something interesting that's going to be used in disparate forms, then this method is exactly the way to go. Otherwise, it seems like overkill. –  siride Jul 20 '13 at 3:03
1  
+1 It's better because it's not consuming the Click event, rather just building the behavior into the button itself. This solution involves no event handler, and puts the code exactly where it belongs. Whether that's overkill or not is irrelevant; the amount of code to write is essentially the same, and it's a reusable and maintainable solution - future self will never ask "where have I coded this button's behavior again?" because, well, the code is obviously in the MyButton class. With any other solution if the button ever needs to be reused elsewhere, there's a problem. –  retailcoder Jul 20 '13 at 3:14
    
@retailcoder: no, there is such a thing as overengineering. This is it. See Jeff Atwood's blog for today, btw: codinghorror.com/blog/2013/07/rule-of-three.html. Don't waste time with overengineered reuse until you actually need it, especially for this obviously trivial program. –  siride Jul 20 '13 at 3:27
3  
Arguments about over-engineering aside, I really like the elegance of this approach. As another commenter said, it puts the responsibility of the button's behavior squarely where it belongs, in the button object. This applies object-oriented principles in a much cleaner way, and the only thing I don't like about it is that I didn't think of it. Anything that takes the logic out of the handlers and code-behinds of the world and puts it into the object itself is a step in the right direction. This isn't over-engineered, this is thoughtfully crafted. –  David Jul 20 '13 at 3:34
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Probably the easiest way would be to have each button invoke the same click handler. Then inside of your handler use the Sender instead of hard coding Button1.

private void buttons_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        var theButton = (Button) sender;
        if (theButton.BackColor != Color.Lime)
        {
            theButton.BackColor = Color.Lime;
        }
        else
        {
            theButton.BackColor = Color.White;
        }
    }
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You can get the button that raised the Click event by casting sender to Button.

You can then add the same handler to every button.

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2  
There's an implicit "Have the same method handle all of the buttons events" in here too. You can choose a control's event handler in visual studio by selecting the control, then in the properties window select "events" and scroll down until you find "Click". Then in the drop-down box next to "Click" you can pick the method that you want to be called when the click event happened –  Pete Baughman Jul 19 '13 at 20:24
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I'm a VB guy.... in VB.Net you can add multiple handlers for events and connect multiple events to the same handler.

This sub hooks all clicks to color the buttons.

Private Sub ColorButtons(sender As System.Object, e As System.EventArgs) _
Handles Button1.Click, Button2.Click, ..

I do this all the time accidentally because I drag/copy a control to make a new one and the new button gets added to the original's events.

Other Subs can handle the same events to do other work - both will execute.

No idea how to do this in C#.

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It's not different in C#. –  Bill Gregg Jul 20 '13 at 2:54
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The proper way to do this really is to associate each button's click event to the function you have coded for that purpose (you want the function to run when the button is clicked, right?), so add the following (or similar) to an appropriate section of your code:

MyButton1.Click += new RoutedEventHandler(buttons_Click);
MyButton2.Click += new RoutedEventHandler(buttons_Click);
etc...

You can associate as many controls to the event handler as you like.

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Note that the RoutedEventHandler part is redundant because the Click event already specifies it, so MyButton1.Click += buttons_Click; is sufficient. –  retailcoder Jul 20 '13 at 4:12
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What I usually do before is this:

private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    button1.PerformClick();
}

This code will just simply run the codes under button1_Click.

But try not to practice as such and just simply put it in a function/method just like what David suggested.

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Refer this link

http://dotnet-developerzone.blogspot.in/2014/06/create-own-button-click-event-in-cnet.html

Create button events and properties with the help of it

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Link only answers are not entertained in SO because the answer would lose its value if the linked page were to become unavailable. Please add details or sample code to your answer. –  Harry Jun 28 at 8:48
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