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This could seem like an obviously hopeless case, but is there a trick to create a cyclic graph of immutable objects in Perl? Something like this:

package Node;
use Moose;
has [qw/parent child/] => (is => 'ro', isa => 'Node');

package main;
my $a = Node->new;
my $b = Node->new(parent => $a);

Now if I wanted $a->child to point to $b, what can I do?

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1  
Maybe a stupid question, but why does immutability matter? –  Ether Nov 21 '09 at 19:47
1  
For me it makes easier to reason about the Node objects. For other reasons see the immutability tag. –  zoul Nov 21 '09 at 19:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I had to go and look at how really immutable languages do something like this, and I think the following is probably a reasonable attempt.

use 5.10.0;
{

    package Node;
    use Moose;
    has [qw(parent child)] => ( isa => 'Node', is => 'ro' );

    sub BUILD {
        my ( $self, $p ) = @_;
        return unless exists $p->{_child};
        my $child = Node->new( parent => $self, %{ delete $p->{_child} }, );
        $self->meta->get_attribute('child')->set_value( $self, $child );
    }
}

say Node->new( _child => {} )->dump

Basically instead of trying to build the objects separately, you have the parent auto-vivify the child based on passing in it's arguments. The output for this is, which is I believe the structure you were wanting.

$VAR1 = bless( {
                 'child' => bless( {
                                     'parent' => $VAR1
                                   }, 'Node' )
               }, 'Node' );
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1  
Immutable and cyclic is oxymoron. It's way how immutable languages cope with it. In Erlang for example you can't make any cyclic data structure. Involve immutability is way how to prevent cycles and is reason why immutability involve. –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Nov 21 '09 at 22:45
    
For a counterexample, see haskell.org/haskellwiki/Tying_the_Knot –  Greg Bacon Nov 23 '09 at 11:19

You could play games with lazy initialization:

package Node;
use Moose;

has parent => (
  is => 'ro',
  isa => 'Node',
  lazy => 1,
  init_arg => undef,
  builder => '_build_parent',
);

has _parent => (
  is => 'ro',
  init_arg => 'parent',
);

has child => (
  is => 'ro',
  isa => 'Node',
  lazy => 1,
  init_arg => undef,
  builder => '_build_child',
);

has _child => (
  is => 'ro',
  init_arg => 'child',
  predicate => undef,
);

has name => is => 'ro', isa => 'Str';

Generate the builders and predicates on the fly:

BEGIN {
  for (qw/ parent child /) {
    no strict 'refs';

    my $squirreled = "_" . $_;

    *{"_build" . $squirreled} = sub {
      my($self) = @_;
      my $proto = $self->$squirreled;
      ref $proto eq "REF" ? $$proto : $proto;
    };

    *{"has" . $squirreled} = sub {
      my($self) = @_;
      defined $self->$squirreled;
    };
  }
}

This allows

my $a = Node->new(parent => \my $b, name => "A");
   $b = Node->new(child  =>     $a, name => "B");

for ($a, $b) {
  print $_->name, ":\n";
  if ($_->has_parent) {
    print "  - parent: ", $_->parent->name, "\n";
  }
  elsif ($_->has_child) {
    print "  - child: ", $_->child->name, "\n";
  }
}

Its output is

A:
  - parent: B
B:
  - child: A

The code could be more elegant with η-conversion‎, but Moose won't pass parameters to builder methods.

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I'm still very new to Moose, but would a trigger work?

use Modern::Perl;

package Node;
use Moose;
has 'parent' => (
    is => 'ro',
    isa => 'Node',
    trigger => sub{
        my ($self, $parent) = @_;
        $parent->{child} = $self unless defined $parent->child;
    }
);

has 'child' => (
    is => 'ro',
    isa => 'Node',
    trigger => sub{
        my ($self, $child) = @_;
        $child->{parent} = $self unless defined $child->parent;
    }
);

package main;
my $p = Node->new;
my $c = Node->new(parent => $p);

say $p, ' == ', $c->parent;
say $c, ' == ', $p->child;
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It's cheating to treat your Moose object as a HashRef. It might be one today, but there's no guarantee that it will be tomorrow. –  Piers Cawley Jun 7 '12 at 13:33

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