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I have created folowing simple class:

class Test
  def initialize(a, b)
    @a = a
    @b = b
  end

  def test
    puts @a
  end
end

IS there a way to replace @a with self? Everytime I tried to do this I received an error:

undefined method `a'

The reason I am doing this is because I would like to create a new object with two parameters, and later operate on these parameters like:

d = MyObject('title', 'Author')
d.showAuthor
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closed as unclear what you're asking by matt, the Tin Man, Roman C, Code Lღver, smerny Jul 20 '13 at 13:03

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It can be done and actually is done for these classes: Array, String, Integer, Float, Rational, Complex and Hash. If you consider the Test class (bad name by the way) of equal importance then consider:

class Test
  def initialize(a, b)
    @a = a
    @b = b
  end

  def test
    puts @a
  end
end

module Kernel
  def Test(*args)
    Test.new(*args)  #that's right, just call new anyway!
  end
end

book = Test('title', 'Author')
book.test # => title

Since the Kernel module is inherited by Object, the global namespace now has a Test method. Don't do this unless you absolutely need it.

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1  
BTW: it's common practice to make such methods that are not actually intended to be called as methods (they are more like global procedures) private so that you don't accidentally call them like foo.Test('bla'). –  Jörg W Mittag Jul 20 '13 at 4:13
    
Thank you. This is what I needed –  meso_2600 Jul 20 '13 at 22:10
class Test
  attr_accessor :a,:b   #creates methods a,b,a=,b= and @a and @b variables

  def initialize(a, b)
    self.a = a  #calls a=
    self.b = b  #calls b=
  end

  def test
    puts a  #calls method a; self.a would do the same.
  end

  def self.[](a,b)
    new(a,b)
  end
end

This will let you drop the new (but you have to change the parens to square brackets) So you can call:

d=Test['dog','cat']
d.a  #'dog'
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So you need to access your instance variables from outside the instance? You can use attr_accessor to do that:

class Test
  attr_accessor :a
  attr_accessor :b

  def initialize(a, b)
    @a = a
    @b = b
  end
end

t = Test.new(:foo, :bar)
t.a
t.b

attr_accessor let's you both read and write the instance variable. If you only need to read it, you can use attr_reader, and if you only need to change it you can use attr_writer.

More on attribute accessors: http://stackoverflow.com/a/4371458/289219

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what's the difference between attr_ and attribute_ ? –  meso_2600 Jul 19 '13 at 21:53
    
There is no such thing called attribute_accessor in plain ruby. –  Robert Kajic Jul 19 '13 at 21:59
    
@user665967 the difference is in one case I screwed up (attribute_) and the other case is correct (attr_) –  lurker Jul 20 '13 at 0:54
class MyClass

  def initialize(title,author)
    @title = title
    @author = author
  end

  def showAuthor
    @author
  end

end

That will produce...

d = MyClass.new("Grapes of Wrath", "Steinbeck")
d.showAuthor
=> "Steinbeck"
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Yes this is what I have. But is there a way of not using .new? and using self instead of @ ? –  meso_2600 Jul 19 '13 at 21:46

You need to define accesors, you can do it using attr_*:

class Foo
  attr_accessor :a,:b

  def initialize(a, b)
    self.a = a
    self.b = b
  end
end

Also do not use camelCase in Ruby, there is convention to name:

  • variables - snake_case
  • methods - snake_case
  • classes - CapitalCamelCase
  • constants - CAPITAL_SNAKE_CASE
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2  
attr_accessible is removed from ActiveRecord and was never part of Ruby. You probably meant to say attr_accessor. –  steenslag Jul 19 '13 at 21:39
    
Fixed. Thanks @steenslag. –  hauleth Jul 19 '13 at 22:36

When you use self.a, Ruby is looking for a method a for the class represented by self, so you get an undefined method error (since you did not define a method called a). You probably are looking for:

class Test
  attr_accessor :a, :b

  def initialize(a, b)
    self.a = a
    self.b = b
  end

  def test
    puts self.a   # "puts a" would be adequate here since it's not ambiguous
  end
end
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3  
attr_accessor –  steenslag Jul 19 '13 at 21:44
    
Yes this is what I have. But is there a way of not using .new? –  meso_2600 Jul 19 '13 at 21:52
1  
@user665967 No ruby doesn't let you overload the ()'s. But you can overload [] to get Test[ "foo", "bar" ]. This isn't Python, don't try to beat the syntax int it –  jozefg Jul 19 '13 at 21:54
    
@steenslag oops and thanks! Duh, talk about a brain fart... –  lurker Jul 20 '13 at 0:53

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