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I am trying to implement a voting system similar to stackoverflow or reddit where a user would only be allowed to vote once on a given post.

After following the advice given here

storing upvotes/downvotes in mongodb

I have created two schemas to store the upvotes and the downvotes. For each user I am keeping track of the posts that user has voted on.

Post Schema :

var postSchema = new Schema({
    name: String,
    votes: Number,
    votetype: Number,
    postedBy: { type: String, ref: 'User' },
});

User Schema :

var userSchema = new Schema({
    twittername: String,
    twitterID: Number,
    votedPosts : [{ _id : mongoose.Schema.Types.ObjectId , votetype: Number }]
});

Depending on the the current user each post is going to have a different view, if the user has voted on the post before the upvote button or downvote button is going to be orange (similar to stackoverflow) so I have the following (simplified) backbone model for a post:

var PostModel = Backbone.Model.extend({
    urlRoot : '/tweet',
    idAttribute: '_id',
    defaults:{
        name: '',
        votes: 0,
        votetype: 0,
        postedBy : '',
    },

    upvote: function(){
        this.set ({votetype : 1 }, {votes : this.get('votes') + 1});
        this.save();
        $.ajax({
            type: "POST",
            url:"/upvote",
            data : {postID : this.id , userID : window.userID , vote: 1},
            success : function(result){
                console.log(result);
            },
            error: function(jqXHR, textStatus, errorThrown) {
                console.log(textStatus, errorThrown);
            }

        });

    },


}); 

So votetype starts with a "0" if the user hasn't voted on the post before, and its "1" or "-1" depending on the vote. In the upvote function, as I update and save the votetype of that post, I also send a ajax request to add that post to the user's votes posts array in the post controller like the following :

exports.upvote = function(req,res){
  var postID = req.body.postID;
  var newvotetype = req.body.vote;

  User.findOne({twitterID : req.body.userID}, {votedPosts : { $elemMatch: { "_id":  postID  }}},
         function(err, post) { 
              if (post.votedPosts.length == 0) { 
                //append to the array
                User.update({twitterID : req.body.userID} , { $push : {votedPosts : {_id : postID , votetype: newvotetype}}} ,function (err, user, raw) {
                    if (err){console.log(err);}
                });

                console.log(post);
                console.log("no one has voted on this before");

              } 
              else { 
                //update in the existing array
                User.update({twitterID : req.body.userID, 'votedPosts._id':  postID  }, { $set : {'votedPosts.$.votetype' : newvotetype}} ,function (err, user, raw) {
                    if (err){console.log(err);}
                });
              }
          }
  );
  res.send("success");
  res.end();
}; 

I might have some bad design decisions but so far it seems like this works fine. Please please tell me if I can make some improvements on my code, or anything else on my design.

Now comes the tricky part. Somehow I have to look through both of these schemas and change the "votetype" of every post before doing a collection.fetch().. I came up with a ugly solution like this :

https://gist.github.com/gorkemyurt/6042558

(i put it in a gits so maybe its more readable, sorry for the ugly code..)

and once I update the vote type of each post depending on the user I pass it to my backbone view, and in my template I do something very basic like:

<div class="post-container">
      <div id="arrow-container">
            <% if (votetype == 1 ) { %>
                  <p><img id="arrowup" src="/images/arrow-up-orange.jpg"></p>
                  <p><img id="arrowdown" src="/images/arrow-down.jpg"></p>
            <% } %>
            <% if ( votetype  == 0 ) { %>
                  <p><img id="arrowup" src="/images/arrow-up.jpg"></p>
                  <p><img id="arrowdown" src="/images/arrow-down.jpg"></p>
            <% } %>
            <% if ( votetype  == -1 ) { %>
                  <p><img id="arrowup" src="/images/arrow-up.jpg"></p>
                  <p><img id="arrowdown" src="/images/arrow-down-orange.jpg"></p>
            <% } %>
      </div>

      <div id="text-container">
            <p><h2><%- name %></h2></p>
            <p><%- dateCreated %></p>
            <p>Posted by: <%- postedBy %></p>
      </div>
</div>

This solution works, but I dont think its really efficient to look up all the posts and all the posts that the user has voted on every-time a user opens the page to render the custom view of posts.. Can anyone think of a better way to do this? I am open to any advice or criticism about my code.. thanks in advance

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+50

There're many things that can be improved:

First, you client-side code is a low hanging fruit for an attacker - you do an atomic operation (upvote/downvote) with two requests, and the first request not only sends vote type but also sends total number of votes:

this.set ({votetype : 1 }, {votes : this.get('votes') + 1});
this.save();
// btw this looks broken, the second argument for `set` is options, so 
// if you want to set votes, you should move them to the first argument:
this.set ({votetype : 1, votes : this.get('votes') + 1});

But, how your application will respond if the attacker will send 100 or even 1000 votes? This operation should be atomic, and you should increment votes on the server when you make POST request to the /upvote endpoint.

Second, you don't really need to store votetype on the post itself - whenever user votes, you change the votetype which is visible for all users but you later hide it with the loop and it just strange to store a votetype of the last vote on the post where you clearly need to have a votetype of the particular user, therefore, you don't need it in the schema and can remote it. You can remove votetype from the posts and you can remove the loop by storing votes history on the post itself, so whenever you want to display a post or a list of posts, you can easily filter the array to contain just the vote of the given user, so you schema will look like this:

var postSchema = new Schema({
   name: String,
   votesCount: Number,
   votes: [{ user_id : mongoose.Schema.Types.ObjectId , type: Number }],
   postedBy: { type: String, ref: 'User' },
});

And then you can get a post and filter votes with something like:

Post.findOne({_id:<post-id>)}, function(err, post){
     post.vote = post.votes.filter(function(vote){
         return vote.user_id === req.body.userID;
     })[0].type;
     res.send(post)
  }
)
// or list of posts
Post.find(function(err, posts){
     posts.forEach(function(post){
         post.vote = post.votes.filter(function(vote){
             return vote.user_id === req.body.userID;
         })[0].type;
     });
     res.send(posts)
  }
)
// you can move vote finding logic in a function: 
function findVote(post) {
    var vote = post.votes.filter(function(vote){
        return vote.user_id === req.body.userID;
    })[0]
    if(vote) return vote.type;
}

If you need to display latest voted posts in the user profile you can filter posts voted by the user:

Post.find({'votes.user_id': req.body.userID}, function(err, posts){
     posts.forEach(function(post){
         // using findVote defined above
         post.vote = findVote(post);
     });
     res.send(posts)
  }
)

Template code on the client side should remain almost the same.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot for your answer, it was really helpful. I am just trying to learn.. can you clarify this part again "But, how your application will respond if the attacker will send 100 or even 1000 votes? This operation should be atomic, and you should increment votes on the server when you make POST request to the /upvote endpoint." –  Gorkem Yurtseven Jul 27 '13 at 20:57
1  
Yes, from what you wrote, I concluded that you make two requests: one when you save PostModel: this.save(); and one right after it when you make POST /upvote. You make these request to assign a user vote, and like anywhere else, you need to ensure that users can't exploit it. What if some user will send only the first request - the one that increments the vote, without sending the second - it basically making their votes anonymous. The proper way would be just assigning new values in the model without calling this.save, and writing to the databe from your server-side code on /upvote –  Alexander Petrovich Jul 28 '13 at 10:43
    
How would you add or change I vote? From my current understand of MongoDB I would have to first see if there's a vote for the user and than add or change the vote. But what happens if another vote for him is added after checking if there's a vote? –  Tobias Müller Aug 7 '13 at 13:11
    
Well, before saving a user vote to the array you should check if user already has voted on the post, you can simply filter the array after you fetch the document, or you can use $elemMatch to query a post containing specific user vote, and if document is returned - do nothing. For example db.posts.find({_id:<post-id>}, { votes: { $elemMatch: { _id: <user-id> } } }) –  Alexander Petrovich Aug 8 '13 at 16:32
    
Or you can simply use $addToSet docs.mongodb.org/manual/reference/operator/addToSet –  Alexander Petrovich Aug 8 '13 at 16:40

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