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I'm trying to understand why my regex below is failing. I'm trying to retrieve a range of values on both sides of the : but my code always fails to the else. range is coming from a command line arg like this java -jar myprogram.jar -R 50:100.

Is it failing because I'm passing a string to the matches() and looking for integers?

Here is my code:

private int[] parseRangeResults(String range) {
   int[] rangeResults = new int[2];

   if(range.matches("\\d+:\\d+")) {

      String[] numbers = range.split(":")
      rangeResults[0] = Integer.parseInt(numbers[0]);
      rangeResults[1] = Integer.parseInt(numbers[1]);
   } else {
      throw new Exception("Invalid Syntax.");
   }
   return rangeResults;
}   
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4  
Why are you using numbers[2] rather than numbers[1], out of interest? –  Jon Skeet Jul 19 '13 at 22:01
    
And what is your sample range? (For example, it matches for "123:123" for me.) –  Jon Skeet Jul 19 '13 at 22:02
    
@JonSkeet my mistake, I assumed the : was added to the string array. I never got to that part of the code to see the failure :-P –  inquisitor Jul 19 '13 at 22:02
1  
@PeterLawrey I'm very much a novice so I'm not questioning your judgement, but I added it in case someone passed an arg like 10a000:500000. If I take it out how would I verify that the data passed is correct? –  inquisitor Jul 19 '13 at 22:07
2  
@code4me See my example. This will throw an exception like java.lang.NummberFormatException: Unable to parse number 10a000 –  Peter Lawrey Jul 19 '13 at 22:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would write it like this

private static int[] parseRangeResults(String range) {
    String[] numbers = range.split(":", -2)
    return new int[] {Integer.parseInt(numbers[0]),Integer.parseInt(numbers[1])};
}

If there is no : it will give you an IndexOutOfBoundException: 1

If there is an invalid number like 1abc:234 you will get NumberFormatException: Unable to parse 1abc

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1  
This was my issue along with passing my function bad data. :-/ –  inquisitor Jul 19 '13 at 22:12
    
@code4me That is where using a debugger or printing your inputs can be helpful ;) –  Peter Lawrey Jul 19 '13 at 22:19
    
Since this way will throw a number of exceptions, in practice, what is the best way to catch them? I normally throw my exceptions to a custom class from the method that causes the exception. But I'm not sure how to handle it the way you've written. –  inquisitor Jul 22 '13 at 12:00
    
@code4me Your should only handle exceptions when you know what you want to do with them. i.e. don't do anything with the exceptions unless you know. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 24 '13 at 22:05

The issue is your handling of the output array. String.split removes the delimiter and does not include it in the array. Your numbers will be in numbers[0] and numbers[1]. numbers[2] will throw an exception.

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private int[] parseRangeResults(String range) {
   int[] rangeResults = new int[2];
   if(range.matches("\\d+:\\d+")) {   
      String[] numbers = range.split(":")
      rangeResults[0] = Integer.parseInt(numbers[0]);
      rangeResults[1] = Integer.parseInt(numbers[1]);
   } else {
      throw new Exception("Invalid Syntax.");
   }
   return rangeResults;
}
share|improve this answer

Regex "\\d+:\\d+" for string "asdf123:456qwerty" will always return true

Use that regex instead

"^\\d+:\\d+$"

Or use exceptions

try{
    Integer.parseInt("asdf");
}catch(NumberFormatException e){
    throw ...;
}

And

try{
    String s1 = p[0];
    String s2 = p[1];
}catch(ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException e){
    throw ...;
}

PS. Are you sure about numbers[2] ?

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