Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am new to multithreading and hence started with a small program. The job expected from the program is, to print integers one after the other by means of two threads in such a way that one thread should print one number and the other thread should print the next number and this process should continue till a maximum number defined.

For this I wrote a small program and iam facing dead lock. I tried to find mutex owner using gdb but it;s just printing $3 = 2 when I execute print mutex command.

Here is the source code:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <pthread.h>
#include <signal.h>

const int MAX_NUM = 13;

pthread_cond_t cond[1] = {PTHREAD_COND_INITIALIZER,};
pthread_mutex_t mutex = PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER;

int Count = 0;

using namespace std;

void* thread1(void*)
{
    do {
        cout<<"inside thread 1 abt to acquire lock"<<endl;
        // Increment counter in thread1
        pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex);
        cout<<"inside thread 1 blocked"<<endl;
        pthread_cond_wait(&cond[0],&mutex);
        cout<<"after pthread_cond_wait in thread1"<<endl;
        pthread_cond_signal(&cond[1]);
        if(Count < MAX_NUM)
        {
            Count++;
            pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);
            cout<<"Printing from thread 1"<<endl;
            cout<<Count<<endl;
        }
        else
        {
            pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);
            pthread_exit(NULL);
        }
    }while(1);
 }

 void* thread2(void*)
 {
     do{
         cout<<"inside thread 2 abt to acquire lock"<<endl;
         pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex);
         cout<<"inside thread 2 blocked"<<endl;
         pthread_cond_wait(&cond[1],&mutex);
         // Increment counter in thread2
         pthread_cond_signal(&cond[0]);
         if(Count < MAX_NUM)
         {
             Count++;
             pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);
             cout<<"Printing from thread 2"<<endl;
             cout<<Count<<endl;
         }
         else
         {
             pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);
             pthread_exit(NULL);
         }
    }while(1);
}

int main()
{
    pthread_t t[2];
    void* (*fun[2])(void*);
    fun[0]=thread1;
    fun[1]=thread2;

    for (int i =0 ; i < 2; ++i)
    {
        pthread_create(&t[i],NULL,fun[i],NULL);
    }
    cout<<"threads created"<<endl;

    pthread_cond_signal(&cond[0]);

    cout<<"In main after sending signal"<<endl;


    pthread_join(t[0],NULL);
    pthread_join(t[1],NULL);

    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

Output is:
inside thread 1 abt to acquire lock
inside thread 1 blocked
inside thread 2 abt to acquire lock
inside thread 2 blocked
threads created
In main after sending signal

I expected main() thread to send a signal to thread 1 which does it's job (i.e. updating counter) and then passes signal to thread 2 which does it's job (i.e. updating counter) and passes signal to thread 1. This process should continue until max number is reached. If max number is reached each process unlocks mutex and exits gracefully.

Please help me. I really tried a lot nothing worked.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

the line

pthread_cond_t cond[1] = {PTHREAD_COND_INITIALIZER,};

defines an array of size 1, but later on you use cond[1], the second entry in the array, which is undefined. Did you mean

pthread_cond_t cond[2] = {PTHREAD_COND_INITIALIZER,PTHREAD_COND_INITIALIZER};

This looks like an unlucky typo. (Due to the preceeding MAX_NUM = 13?)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 at least for the nice joke! I also avoid defining constants of 666, 13, aso. Baaaad stuff ;o) ... –  πάντα ῥεῖ Jul 19 '13 at 23:10

In addition to @TooTone's observation you need to understand one aspect of how condition variables work. If you signal a condition variable when no thread is blocked on it nothing will happen. The condition variable has no memory, so if a little bit later a thread blocks on in it will stay locked until the condition is signaled again.

Your main function signals cond[0] right after it started the threads, so it is possible that the threads haven't reached their blocking point yet. Or if they are blocked then it can happen that when one thread signals the other one that other one isn't blocked. So after you fix your condition variable array you will see that the test runs a bit more, but eventually deadlocks again.

I was able to make it work using a quick & dirty trick of introducing delays before signaling the condition variables. This gives the threads time to reach their blocking points before the signaling happens. Here is the modified code:

const int MAX_NUM = 13;

pthread_cond_t cond[2] = {PTHREAD_COND_INITIALIZER,PTHREAD_COND_INITIALIZER};
pthread_mutex_t mutex = PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER;

int Count = 0;

using namespace std;

void* thread1(void*)
{
    do {
        cout<<"inside thread 1 abt to acquire lock"<<endl;
        // Increment counter in thread1
        pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex);
        cout<<"inside thread 1 blocked"<<endl;
        pthread_cond_wait(&cond[0],&mutex);
        cout<<"after pthread_cond_wait in thread1"<<endl;
        if(Count < MAX_NUM)
        {
            Count++;
            pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);
            cout<<"Printing from thread 1"<<endl;
            cout<<Count<<endl;
            usleep(1000000);
            pthread_cond_signal(&cond[1]);
        }
        else
        {
            pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);
            usleep(1000000);
            pthread_cond_signal(&cond[1]);
            pthread_exit(NULL);
        }
    }while(1);
 }

 void* thread2(void*)
 {
     do{
         cout<<"inside thread 2 abt to acquire lock"<<endl;
         pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex);
         cout<<"inside thread 2 blocked"<<endl;
         pthread_cond_wait(&cond[1],&mutex);
         // Increment counter in thread2
         if(Count < MAX_NUM)
         {
             Count++;
             pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);
             cout<<"Printing from thread 2"<<endl;
             cout<<Count<<endl;
             usleep(1000000);
             pthread_cond_signal(&cond[0]);
         }
         else
         {
             pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);
             usleep(1000000);
             pthread_cond_signal(&cond[0]);
             pthread_exit(NULL);
         }
    }while(1);
}

int main()
{
    pthread_t t[2];
    void* (*fun[2])(void*);
    fun[0]=thread1;
    fun[1]=thread2;

    for (int i =0 ; i < 2; ++i)
    {
        pthread_create(&t[i],NULL,fun[i],NULL);
    }
    cout<<"threads created"<<endl;
    usleep(1000000);
    pthread_cond_signal(&cond[0]);

    cout<<"In main after sending signal"<<endl;


    pthread_join(t[0],NULL);
    pthread_join(t[1],NULL);

    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

Using condition variables for this kind of thing isn't the best idea. Semaphores are better suited to the task because those do have memory and remember their signaled state even if nobody is waiting on them when they are signaled.

share|improve this answer
    
It's working fine after correcting condition variables declaration...costly typo :) –  suresh Jul 20 '13 at 9:52
    
@suresh Glad you fixed the typo :) Re Miguel's post, I thought it was v valuable. Multi threaded programs will sometimes work 99.9% of the time and fail 0.1% of the time. They're not as "deterministic" as single threaded programs, so your code might look ok, but on, for example, a production server might cause significant downtime and problems. –  TooTone Jul 30 '13 at 8:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.