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This code is supposed to switch the display property of all children elements of #slide-container to "block" with time delay two seconds between the switches.

var magic = window.setInterval(function(){
    if (document.readyState === "complete") {
            var children = document.getElementById('slide-container').children;
            for (var i = 0; children.length > i; i++ ) {
                setTimeout(function(){
                    children[i].style.display = "block";
                    console.log(i);
                },2000);
            }
            magic = window.clearInterval(magic);
        } else {
            console.log("...");
        }
}, 1000);

I am using it along with this html:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>

    <head>
        <meta charset="utf-8">
        <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=edge,chrome=1">
        <title></title>
        <meta name="description" content="">
        <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width">
    </head>
    <body>
        <ul id="slide-container">
            <li style="display: none;"><img src="http://i.imgur.com/8qBcyzc.jpg"></li>
            <li style="display: none;"><img src="http://i.imgur.com/oxMTFTF.png"></li>
            <li style="display: none;"><img src="http://i.imgur.com/JTM6Yqg.jpg"></li>
        </ul>

    </body>
</html>

I get error Uncaught TypeError: Cannot read property 'style' of undefined

It says it cannot find children or children[0]. But that variable has been specified and the dom nodes exist.

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2  
Check here stackoverflow.com/questions/1451009/… –  elclanrs Jul 19 '13 at 23:13
    
possible duplicate of Javascript closure inside loops - simple practical example –  Felix Kling Jul 19 '13 at 23:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Closure issue.
Try adding a 3rd parameter to the setTimeout (doesn't work):

setTimeout(function(i){
   children[i].style.display = "block";
   console.log(i);
}, 2000, i);

Example

Another formate:

    var i = 0;
    var timer = setInterval(function () {
        children[i].style.display = "block";
        i++;
        if (i == children.length) {
            clearInterval(timer);
        }
    }, 2000);

EXAMPLE

ES6 is around the corner, the let statement is especially built for situations like this:

for (let i = 0; children.length > i; i++ ) {
   setTimeout(function(){
      children[i].style.display = "block";
      console.log(i);
   }, 2000);
}

However this is not the answer you need for right now. This was just a note.

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The images are shown but all at once. The point is that there is 2 seconds delay for the next image to appear. –  Johnny Jul 19 '13 at 23:19
    
Yeah, iv'e been looking forward to that –  Connor Jul 19 '13 at 23:20
    
@Johnny Oh yes, sorry. –  Shawn31313 Jul 19 '13 at 23:21
    
@Johnny Check out the edit. I suggest just using a setInterval –  Shawn31313 Jul 19 '13 at 23:25
    
@Shawn31313 The interval one works perfect. Thanks for help! –  Johnny Jul 19 '13 at 23:31

Try encasing the setTimeout in an IIFE (Immediately invoked function expression)

 for (var i = 0; children.length > i; i++) {
      (function (index) {
                setTimeout(function () {
                    children[index].style.display = "block";
                    console.log(i);
                }, 2000);
            })(i);
        }

Check Fiddle

The reference of i is common to all the functions executed by setTimeout . So by the time the function inside executes , the value of i will point to children.length .

But there is no element that refers to children[children.length] which does not exist and throws an error.

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The images are shown but all at once. The point is that there is 2 seconds delay for the next image to appear. –  Johnny Jul 19 '13 at 23:36

By the time setTimeout is ready i will be the length of children so you have to capture the value of i

try this

var time = 2000;
for (var i = 0; children.length > i; i++ ) {
    (function( child, time) {
       window.setTimeout(function() {
          child.style.display = "block";
       }, time);
    }( children[i], time));
    time += 2000;
}

or you could do this. ... I have fixed the delay thing

var hideElement = function( element, time) {
   window.setTimeout(function() {
      element.style.display = 'block';
   }, time);
};

var time = 2000;
for (var i = 0; children.length > i; i++ ) {
   hideElement(children[i], time);
   time += 2000;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The second example works perfectly. The first one trows error <code>Uncaught ReferenceError: i is not defined </code>. Nice idea with that hideElement function. BTW. Last example should be 'block' instead of 'none' ;]. Thanks! –  Johnny Jul 19 '13 at 23:28
    
Yeah with the first one it still has to be in the loop. –  Connor Jul 19 '13 at 23:32
    
Edit - 1st example –  Connor Jul 19 '13 at 23:33
    
Now both are working! Good idea with the anonymous function, simple and effective. –  Johnny Jul 19 '13 at 23:40

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