Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I already have a list of strings read in from a text file into a 2D array named word ready to be sorted.

The list looks like:

I
like
cherry
pie
and
chocolate
pie

I want the list to look like this after sorted:

and
cherry
chocolate
I
like
pie
pie

The function prototype is below. int counter is the amount of strings, and MAX_CHAR_LEN = 1024 in case you were wondering.

void alphabetize(char word[][MAX_CHAR_LEN], int counter)
{

    return;
}

Notice that sorting by the first character alone is not sufficient, as the list contains two strings that start with "ch"

Can someone provide a function that can do this? Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

You want to use the qsort() function.

qsort(base, num_of_elements, element_size, my_compare);

The comparison function my_compare takes two arguments, each a const void *, and returns a number indicating the relative order of the arguments. A negative number means the first argument is before the second argument. A positive number means the first argument is after the second argument. A zero is returned if the arguments have compared to be equal.

As your string comparison is case insensitive, you will need to create your own comparison function, or find one provided to you by your system that is not part of the C library proper. POSIX provides strcasecmp() for this purpose (Google tells me that _stricmp() is available on Windows).

int my_compare (const void *a, const void *b) {
    return strcasecmp(a, b);
}

Defining the comparison function is usually the trickiest part of using qsort(). You have to understand the context of the pointers that are being passed into that function. When an array of TYPE is passed into qsort(), it will pass a pointer to const TYPE to each argument of the comparison function.

In your case, you would be passing in an array of array of MAX_CHAR_LEN chars. So, each argument to the comparison function is a pointer to const array of MAX_CHAR_LEN chars. This means that technically, the my_compare function should be written like this:

int my_compare (const void *a, const void *b) {
    typedef char TYPE[MAX_CHAR_LEN];
    const TYPE *aa = (const TYPE *)a;
    const TYPE *bb = (const TYPE *)b;
    return strcasecmp(*aa, *bb);
}

The cast on the arguments would normally not be necessary, except that C doesn't really support the notion of a constant array. It converts such a thing into an array of constants, so the cast is required to reflect that.

However, the address of an array is equal to the address of its first element. That is, for the code above, the following assertions would be true:

    assert(aa == (const void *)*aa);
    assert(bb == (const void *)*bb);

So, because the dereference of a pointer to an array equals the decayed address value of the same array, the first implementation of my_compare() is sufficient for your 2-D array.

share|improve this answer
    
Why it is giving warning: warning: initialization discards 'const' qualifier from pointer target type [enabled by default], when cast is removed from the assignment const TYPE *aa = a; ? –  haccks Jun 24 at 7:25
    
@haccks: This is explained in the the text under the my_compare() code block in the answer. –  jxh Jun 24 at 8:10
    
Then, simply can't it be done by using const char (*aa)[MAX_CHAR_LEN] = (const char (*)[MAX_CHAR_LEN])a; const char (*bb)[MAX_CHAR_LEN] = (const char (*)[MAX_CHAR_LEN])a; ? –  haccks Jun 24 at 9:00
1  
@haccks: There is no syntax to express a constant array, which is why you can't find anything about it. qsort() doesn't know what the actual type of the array it is sorting is, it passes a const void *, where void stands for the object being sorted. The decay you are talking about occurred at or before qsort() was passed the array to sort. –  jxh Jun 24 at 17:53
1  
@haccks: See this. –  jxh Jun 24 at 18:22
show 7 more comments

You can use the qsort function to sort. You also need to create a compare function that compares two arrays of chars, and then pass that function pointer as an argument.

Example that sorts ints:

/* qsort example */
#include <stdio.h>      /* printf */
#include <stdlib.h>     /* qsort */

int values[] = { 40, 10, 100, 90, 20, 25 };

int compare (const void * a, const void * b)
{
  return ( *(int*)a - *(int*)b );
}

int main ()
{
  int n;
  qsort (values, 6, sizeof(int), compare); 
  for (n=0; n<6; n++)
     printf ("%d ",values[n]);
  return 0;
}

The above code can easily be adapted to sort arrays of chars instead of ints.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you want to write your own sort function, something like this is pretty straight forward.

for (int i = 0; i < array.size(); i++)
{
    for (int j = i+1; j < array.size(); j++)
    {
        if (array[i] > array[j])
            swap(array[i],array[j]);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

qsort is Good Option. See it's detail here

You can also try Bubble Sort. It's implementation in C is easy - See this Good answer for help

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.