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Let's say I have 3 classes (Parent, Son and Daughter). I'd like Son and Daughter to use the Name getter method of Parent, but I'd like to apply different attributes for each child class, respectively.

public class Parent {

private string name;

public string Name { 
  get { return this.name; }
  set { this.name = value != null ? value.trim() : null; }
}

}

and Son...

public class Son : Parent { 
  [SonAttribute]
  public string Name { // keep parent behavior }
  }
}

Same Name getter method for daughter but with [Daughter] attribute.

Can I do this?

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@TGH - thank you for your answer (looks like it was deleted). I chose p.s.w.g because I don't fully understand the new keyword with respect to a method. –  Kevin Meredith Jul 20 '13 at 3:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Assuming Name virtual on Parent:

public class Parent 
{
    public virtual string Name 
    { 
        get { return this.name; }
        set { this.name = value != null ? value.trim() : null; }
    }
}

You can always do this:

public class Son : Parent 
{
    [SonAttribute]
    public override string Name 
    { 
        get { return base.Name; }
        set { base.Name = value; }
    }
}

If the Name property is not virtual you'll be creating a new property which hides the property on the base type, which is probably not what you want. See Knowing When to Use Override and New Keywords (C# Programming Guide) for details.

share|improve this answer
    
Will the name field of the Son and Daughter classes belong to the Father or the children? –  Kevin Meredith Jul 20 '13 at 3:09
    
@Kevin The private field will belong to the Parent class. –  p.s.w.g Jul 20 '13 at 3:11

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