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This is a probably an embarasing question as no doubt the answer is blindingly obvious.

I've used Visual Studio for years, but this is the first time I've done any 'Console Application' development.

When I run my application the console window pops up, the program output appears and then the window closes as the application exits.

Is there a way to either keep it open until I have checked the output, or view the results after the window has closed?

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which language? –  Naveen Nov 21 '09 at 16:01
    
Don't worry I always forget to do this! –  ChrisF Nov 21 '09 at 16:03
2  
@Naveen: C but thought it would be an IDE thing, not a language thing. –  Martin Nov 21 '09 at 16:05

9 Answers 9

up vote 124 down vote accepted

If you run without debugging (Ctrl+F5) then by default it prompts your to press return to close the window. If you want to use the debugger, you should put a breakpoint on the last line.

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Thanks Tom - that worked perfectly. –  Martin Nov 21 '09 at 16:06
50  
If you have a C++ app and Run Without Debugging and the console window still closes, you need to remember to explicitly set the Subsystem to Console under Configuration Properties / Linker / System. This can happen if you start with an Empty Project, which leaves Subsystem unset. –  Trevor Robinson Aug 25 '10 at 18:39
    
@TrevorRobinson this setting fixed it for me –  Mike Ohlsen Sep 23 '11 at 16:35
    
You can also add the Start Without Debugging button to any toolbars/menus you want, if you root around in the Tools->Customize... dialog. –  mwfearnley Oct 22 '13 at 17:02
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The correct answer is the one by @TrevorRobinson: Here is the expanded version if you have trouble finding out where the config properties are: Right-click on your project in Visual Studio > Properties > Configuration Properties > Linker > System, change Subsystem to "Console" –  Nocturne Jan 9 at 0:39

Right click on your project

Properties>Configuration Properties> Linker> System

select Console (/SUBSYSTEM:CONSOLE) in SubSystem option.

Now try it...it should work

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If you're using .NET, put Console.ReadLine() before the end of the program.

It will wait for <ENTER>.

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1  
+1 - Either that or Console.ReadKey() to just wait for any key. –  Fredrik Mörk Nov 21 '09 at 16:02
    
Unfortunately not using .Net :( –  Martin Nov 21 '09 at 16:15
    
-1, modifying code to work around the IDE –  binki Aug 26 at 15:37

Goto Debug Menu->Press StartWithoutDebugging

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This works perfect for C++ in VS 2012 ! –  Enrico Jun 11 '13 at 8:37

None of these apply to c++ is there a way for C++ ?

Yess
system("pause");

This will add press any key to continue and works in vs 2012

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try to call getchar() right before main() returns.

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This also works c++ VS 2012 –  Enrico Jun 11 '13 at 8:40
    
Works perfect!! –  Pyraego.com Sep 10 '13 at 17:27
    
yes this is working –  madhawa priyashantha Aug 20 at 5:36

add “| pause” in command arguments box under debugging section at project properties.

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1  
This would be a great solution if it worked. pause appears to only work in batch files, and while it receives input from your program on STDIN, it doesn't re-print that text. I tried replacing | with &&, but it had no effect -- presumably because it isn't executing with a command shell (cmd.exe). –  Brian Vandenberg Aug 6 '12 at 18:49

You could run your executable from a command prompt. This way you could see all the output. Or, you could do something like this:

int a = 0;
scanf("%d",&a);

return YOUR_MAIN_CODE;

and this way the window would not close until you enter data for the a variable.

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Use console.readline. Yours is writing the line but not reading it.

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