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Is there a way to temporarily render the HTML markup in documentation comments in IntelliJ IDEA? I want to be able to do this because it makes reading some documentation easier. For example, consider the following snippets from the jUnit source:

/**
 * The <code>Test</code> annotation tells JUnit that the <code>public void</code> method
 * ...
 * ...
 * <p>
 * A simple test looks like this:
 * <pre>
 * public class Example {
 *    <b>&#064;Test</b>
 *    public void method() {
 *       org.junit.Assert.assertTrue( new ArrayList().isEmpty() );
 *    }
 * }
 * </pre>
 * <p>
 * The <code>Test</code> annotation supports two optional parameters.
 * The first, <code>expected</code>, declares that a test method should throw
 * ...
 * ...
 * <pre>
 *    &#064;Test(<b>expected=IndexOutOfBoundsException.class</b>) public void outOfBounds() {
 *       new ArrayList&lt;Object&gt;().get(1);
 *    }
 * </pre></p>
 * <p>
 * The second optional parameter, <code>timeout</code>, causes a test to fail if it takes
 * longer than a specified amount of clock time (measured in milliseconds). The following test    fails:
 * <pre>
 *    &#064;Test(<b>timeout=100</b>) public void infinity() {
 *       while(true);
 *    }
 * </pre>
 * <b>Warning</b>: while <code>timeout</code> is useful to catch and terminate
 * infinite loops, it should <em>not</em> be considered deterministic. The
 * ...
 * ...
 * <pre>
 *    &#064;Test(<b>timeout=100</b>) public void sleep100() {
 *       Thread.sleep(100);
 *    }
 * </pre>
 *
 *
 * @since 4.0
 */

All the markup, not to mention the HTML encodings, makes it a tad difficult to parse the documentation.

I tried searching for a way to do this, but nothing meaningful turned up. Maybe I am not using the right keywords?

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1 Answer 1

You can use Quick Documentation (Ctrl-Q / menu -> view -> quick documentation) either when you are (which means the caret is) in the comment itself or somewhere in the code where the symbol is referenced - e.g. on the Test in

@Test
public void myTest() throws Exception
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