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I am trying to understand Unichars. Coming from Ascii, Unichars just seems like a more advanced and complex library of character codes. Now I am building a simple application that will accept a string "\u####" that will represent the Unicode, that leads me to my first problem. what is the best way to format Unicode, after searching the web for so long, I feel like I have seen many ways to do it. Or maybe I just don't have the best concept of it yet.

Lets take the recycle symbol for example. U+267B

I would like my Program to convert that into the actual symbol, and display it?

Then id like to read in any symbol and convert that back into Unicode?

I am expecting this to be very simple, but I am trying to teach this to my self...

Thanks OverFlow!!!!

ps. Whats the command on a MacBook Pro to type in Unicode and have the corresponding symbol appear?

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What do you mean by "read in any symbol"? Read from where? In your program source code you can write NSString *s = @"\u267B" to get a string with the recycle character. –  Martin R Jul 20 '13 at 8:47
    
Yes, there are two TextViews. You type '\u267B' into one, hit a button, the program will then convert the NSString @"\u267b" into the Symbol, and displays it in the other. Then the same would work in revers, where you could enter the symbol in one box, hit the button and its Unicode would be displayed in the other TextView. –  Daniel Watson Jul 20 '13 at 19:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This should work for you:

NSString *text = inputView.text; // For example "\u267B"
NSLog(@"%@", text);
// Output: \u267B
NSData *d = [text dataUsingEncoding:NSASCIIStringEncoding];
NSString *converted = [[NSString alloc] initWithData:d encoding:NSNonLossyASCIIStringEncoding];
NSLog (@"%@", converted);
// Output: ♻
outputView.text = converted;

It uses the fact that NSNonLossyASCIIStringEncoding decodes \uNNNN to the corresponding Unicode character.

To convert in the other direction (from "♻" to "\u267B"), you just have to exchange NSASCIIStringEncoding and NSNonLossyASCIIStringEncoding in the above code.

UPDATE: As you correctly noticed, the "reverse direction" does not encode characters in the range <= U+00FF. The following code converts these characters as well:

NSString *text = inputView.text; // For example "♻A"
NSLog(@"%@", text);
// Output: ♻A
NSMutableString *converted = [NSMutableString string];
for (NSInteger i = 0; i < [text length]; i++) {
    unichar c = [text characterAtIndex:i];
    [converted appendFormat:@"\\u%04X", c];
}
NSLog (@"%@", converted);
// Output: \u267B\u0041
outputView.text = converted;
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Wow! That works perfectly. Thank you! –  Daniel Watson Jul 20 '13 at 20:03
    
@DanielWatson: You are welcome! –  Martin R Jul 20 '13 at 20:04
    
Actually I do have one more question. When converting characters from unicode characters within the regular ascii range. –  Daniel Watson Jul 21 '13 at 0:00
    
Actually I do have one more question. When converting characters from unicode characters within the regular ascii range. NSString *uniCodeText = _txtUnichar.stringValue; NSData *d = [uniCodeText dataUsingEncoding:NSNonLossyASCIIStringEncoding]; NSString *converted = [[NSString alloc] initWithData:d encoding:NSASCIIStringEncoding]; _txtCharsOut.string = converted; For Chars ÿ(\u00ff), þ(\u00fe) and all bellow this range the code above spits out the regular ascii values. \377 \376. How can i get it to pump out the Unicodes? –  Daniel Watson Jul 21 '13 at 0:07
    
Sorry i could not format the question above... –  Daniel Watson Jul 21 '13 at 0:11

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