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Could you tell me what's the problem with ?: operator it tells error:

 C2446: ':' : no conversion from 'int' to 'std::basic_ostream<_Elem,_Traits>'   
           c:\documents\visual studio 2005\projects\8.14\8.14\8.14.cpp  36

The Code:

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
int B;
int A=(6,B=8);
bool c = true;
cout << endl << B;
while (B != 100)
{
cout << "qgkdf\n";
(A<B) ? (c = 100, B=100, cout << "!!!") : (A = 100);
A--;
}
_getch();
return 0;
}
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I think the , is not a operator and the line int A=(6,B=8); is incorrect –  abforce Jul 20 '13 at 10:07
5  
@ABFORCE It is an operator. –  hvd Jul 20 '13 at 10:09
    
@hvd: Can it be overload? –  abforce Jul 20 '13 at 10:16
    
@ABFORCE: unfortunately, yes... –  Matthieu M. Jul 20 '13 at 10:18
1  
The problem with the ? operator is that people use it to write code like the above. –  Yakk Jul 20 '13 at 10:39

4 Answers 4

The types of the 2 operands of the conditional operator needs to be the same.

(A<B) ? (c = 100, B=100, cout << "!!!") : (A = 100);

The type of c = 100, B=100, cout << "!!!" is the type of cout << "!!!", which is std::ostream.

The type of of A = 100 is int.

These 2 types do not match, hence the error.

EDIT: The comma operator returns the value of the last part. You cann add an int, for example:

(A<B) ? (c = 100, B=100, (cout << "!!!"), 42) : (A = 100);
//                                      ^^^^

Live example here.

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ok got my mistake –  Grijesh Chauhan Jul 20 '13 at 10:09
    
(A<B) ? (c = 100, B=100, cout << "!!!") : (A = 100 ,cout); //ok –  thomas Jul 20 '13 at 10:16
    
@thomas This is also a solution. As the OP seems to want to obfuscate code, I don't which one he will prefer ;) –  Synxis Jul 20 '13 at 10:17
    
you can substitue with this code, work good : if (A<B) { c = 100; B=100; cout << "!!!"; } else { A = 100; } ; –  Claudio Daffra Jul 20 '13 at 10:26

If you are going to write obfuscated code, make sure you know how to use casts, as the solution is obviously to cast the result of cout << "!!!" to an int:

(A<B) ? (c = 100, B=100, reinterpret_cast<int>(cout << "!!!")) : (A = 100);
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As the return value is not being used it might be clearer to cast both sides to void.
Although not as clear as just using a good old "if".

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This is blatant abuse of the ?: operator. Use an if statement. That's what they're for.

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