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I have a list of comma separated string like below:

    List<string> IdList=new List<string>();

and each element of list has comma separated string like

     1,2,4,5,6,7,8,10,12,15,16
     2,3,5,7,8,9,0,10,16,17
     4,5,89,12,13,1,2,3,6,7,10,16

I want to apply AND operation on this list of string so I get output like below:

      2,5,7,10,16

Is there any efficient way to implement Intersection operation?

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2  
How many strings do you really have, and how important is performance, exactly? Because fundamentally this is a List<List<int>> by the looks of it - and that would be easier to manage... –  Jon Skeet Jul 20 '13 at 10:59
1  
@MaheshChitroda: Well I don't think it'll actually be any number, will it? Will you ever be asked to handle a billion strings? What about a million? Just because it's not absolutely fixed doesn't mean you don't have more context to tell us... –  Jon Skeet Jul 20 '13 at 11:15
1  
@Jon Skeet List has maximum 1000 strings. –  Mahesh Chitroda Jul 20 '13 at 11:18
1  
@Jon Skeet I don't know it's not fix but more than 2000. –  Mahesh Chitroda Jul 20 '13 at 11:25
1  
@Michael Kjörling numerical ranges of those values is from 1 to 200000. –  Mahesh Chitroda Jul 20 '13 at 11:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're actually looking for an intersection.

If you don't need the values in numeric order, you could just treat each string as just comma-separated values. Start with the first list, and just intersect each other one appropriately:

HashSet<string> set = new HashSet<string>(list[0].Split(','));
foreach (var item in list.Skip(1))
{
    set.IntersectWith(item.Split(','));
}
string result = string.Join(",", set);

Complete sample code:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        var list = new List<string>
        {
            "1,2,4,5,6,7,8,10,12,15,16", 
            "2,3,5,7,8,9,0,10,16,17",
            "4,5,89,12,13,1,2,3,6,7,10,16"
        };

        HashSet<string> set = new HashSet<string>(list[0].Split(','));
        foreach (var item in list.Skip(1))
        {
            set.IntersectWith(item.Split(','));
        }
        string result = string.Join(",", set);
        Console.WriteLine(result);
    }
}

Result (order not guaranteed):

2,5,7,10,16
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+1, Was thinking the same lines, but was not sure. –  unlimit Jul 20 '13 at 11:30
    
+1 for including complete sample code. (I'm not spiteful. :)) –  Michael Kjörling Jul 20 '13 at 11:35
    
Great answer less code with efficient result. –  Mahesh Chitroda Jul 20 '13 at 11:44

I don't know about "less memory utilization", but my first shot at this would be something along these lines (untested, coded in browser, no Visual Studio handy yadda yadda):

Dictionary<int,int> occurences = new Dictionary<int,int>();
int numberOfLists = YourCollectionOfOuterLists.Count;

foreach (string list in YourCollectionOfOuterLists) {
    foreach (string value in list.Split(',')) {
        occurences[value] = ((occurences[value] as int) ?? 0) + 1;
    }
}

List<int> output = new List<int>();
foreach (int key in occurences.Keys) {
    if (occurences[key] == numberOfLists) {
        output.Add(key);
    }
}

return String.Join(output.Select(x => x.ToString()), ",");

It might very well be possible to write the code more tersely, but anything that accomplishes what you seem to be after will still have to perform roughly the same steps: decide which elements exist in all lists (which is slightly non-trivial as the number of lists is unknown), then make a new list out of those values.

If you have access to it, something like Parallel.ForEach() might help cut down on wallclock execution time at least of the second loop (and possibly the first, with proper locking/synchronization in place).

If you are after something other than this, please clarify your question to describe exactly what you want.

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I know that we can achieve this in many way but I want a fast and efficient way which use less time because every string has thousands of element and a list has many string of such type. –  Mahesh Chitroda Jul 20 '13 at 11:11
    
Dictionary<> is pretty decent performance-wise, and a few tens of thousands of elements isn't that large a data set. Memory usage will likely be similar regardless of the implementation because the bulk of the memory usage will be to keep track of the candidate values. (Knowing the range of the input values you may be able to use a type with a smaller range than int; e.g., all your example values would fit perfectly in bytes.) Have you determined (e.g. using a profiler) that a naiive implementation is a major performance bottleneck or unacceptable memory hog? –  Michael Kjörling Jul 20 '13 at 11:13

I'm not sure about performance but you can use the Aggregate extension method to 'fold intersections'.

var data = new List<string>
{
    "1,2,4,5,6,7,8,10,12,15,16",
    "2,3,5,7,8,9,0,10,16,17",
    "4,5,89,12,13,1,2,3,6,7,10,16",
};

var fold = data.Aggregate(data[0].Split(',').AsEnumerable(), (d1, d2) => d1.Intersect(d2.Split(',')));
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