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Consider this code:

myBusiness business = new myBusiness();
business.DoWork(); ; ; ; ; ; ;

Why can we use multiple semicolons? Is it a bug in the compiler?

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marked as duplicate by Cody Gray, p.s.w.g, Kirk Woll, Bridge, Frank van Puffelen Jul 20 '13 at 14:30

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5  
Why do you think this would be a bug? What would you expect the compiler to do in this case? –  BoltClock Jul 20 '13 at 12:22
    
@BoltClock Because it’s never meaningful. A compiler could very well guard against it (at the expense of making it more complex, of course). –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 20 '13 at 12:24
1  
@KonradRudolph It could mean the ; key is sticking on your keyboard :) –  Tony Hopkinson Jul 20 '13 at 12:26
2  
@KonradRudolph: So the compiler should decide that this is not meaningful even if it doesn't hurt? That would be work for nothing. I know what E.Lippert would say: "because it isn't worth the cost of designing, implementing, testing and documenting it". –  Tim Schmelter Jul 20 '13 at 12:32
    
You can see this for your answer (Binary Worrier's answer)- stackoverflow.com/questions/4790771/… –  Ishan Jain Jul 20 '13 at 12:35

6 Answers 6

up vote 22 down vote accepted

That's because the semicolon, when used alone, represents the empty statement.

The documentation says:

The empty statement consists of a single semicolon. It does nothing and can be used in places where a statement is required but no action needs to be performed.

And provides the following example:

void ProcessMessages()
{
    while (ProcessMessage())
        ; // Statement needed here.
}

Of course, you can execute as many empty statements as you want in sequence, and nothing will happen.

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1  
+1 you may wish to add an example such as for loop with "I" declared already –  Sayse Jul 20 '13 at 12:25
2  
+1 because I had no idea. –  It'sNotALie. Jul 20 '13 at 12:36

Semicolumn is an empty statement, means "do nothing". Typical example when multiply semicolumns are required is an infinite for loop

  for (int i = 0; i < count; ++i) { // <- ordinary for
    ...
  }

  for (;;) { // <- infinite (for) loop with no initialization, check and increment 
    ...
  }
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Semicolon when used alone represents empty statement.

Also, refer to the answers here - Legal to allow multiple semicolons with nice detailed explanation that why its perfectly legal. Refer to answer by Binary Worrier explained for macros.

From that post -

You can redefine macros to be different to their initial definition, also you can redefine them so they don't exist at all.

Given an assertion macro #define ASSERT(c) if(!c) throw new AssertionFailedException() you can have your coded littered with ASSERT statements.

void Foo(int x) {
    int y = x + 2;
    ASSERT(y != 0);
   int z = x / y;
    . . . .
}

Now consider that you only want the asserts in debug builds, but not in release builds, for release you redefine the macro to be empty (literally #define ASSERT). Now when Foo goes to the compiler for a release build, it looks like this

void Foo(int x) {
    int y = x + 2;
    ;
   int z = x / y;
    . . . .
}

There's now an empty statement where the ASSERT was, because there may or may not be a statement there (depending on build configuration), the compiler needs to be able to handle an empty statement.

Why this convention was kept in C# where there are nothing like C macros, I have no idea, but possibly because it causes little or no harm.

I would guess that multiple ; are elided by the compiler before it starts parsing code, therefore your unreachable ; is ignored by the compiler.

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1  
The compiler doesn't have to elide them. What happens when you execute an empty statement? Exactly. –  Cody Gray Jul 20 '13 at 12:45

The empty statement is valid in all C-derived languages. The most common idiomatic use is in a for statement, e.g.:

for (; ; )
{
}

OR

while (Method())
   ;

OR

void F() {
   //...
   if (done) goto exit;
   //...
   exit: ;
}

OR

if (true)
 {
      ;
 }

OR

if (true)
    ;

All statement are valid.

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1  
"OR" makes it sound like all of those snippets are equivalent, but they're quite different... And what exactly would be the point of if (true) { ; }? –  Cody Gray Jul 20 '13 at 12:43

; is only a line terminator, which tells compiler that this statement is over. If you are using multiple ; in one line, the compiler will think they are multiple statements.

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';' stands for empty statement.

int a;;;;;; // this states that one statement and 5 empty statements 

so there is no bug in this.

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