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Could anybody help me to implement the Decorator design pattern in javascript. I have a TankBase entity:

TankBase = function (x, y, width, height, direction, imageOptions) {
    TankBase.base.call(this, x, y, width, height, imageOptions);
    this.speed = 250;
    this.direction = direction;
    this.render = function (drawEngine) {
        drawEngine.render();
    };
    ...
}

I want to add a new functionality using the Decorator pattern. For example, I want to modify the render() function and draw a health indicator under a tank:

var TankHealthDecorator = function (tank) {
    var _tank = tank;
    this.render = function (drawEngine) {
        // draw a health indicator
        ...
        _tank.render(drawEngine);
    };
}

Usage:

var tank = new TankHealthDecorator(new HeavyTank());

where HeavyTank inherits TankBase.

How should I modify TankHealthDecorator() to use it like a wrapper for a tank instance?

EDIT:

Thank you, Paul, for a great article:

I would start here: addyosmani.com/blog/decorator-pattern Good write up. – Paul

share|improve this question
    
Why exactly do you need this to equal tank? –  Shawn31313 Jul 20 '13 at 17:28
2  
I would start here: addyosmani.com/blog/decorator-pattern Good write up. –  Paul Jul 20 '13 at 17:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Functionally I think what you have is pretty close. I'd store off the original render function, assign a new one, and then simply apply it from within the decorated one. I also don't see a need to create the decorator as an object, but that's probably more of a preference thing.

var DrawEngine = { render: function() {
    console.log('render');
} };

var TankBase = function (x, y, width, height, direction, imageOptions) {
    this.speed = 250;
    this.direction = direction;
    this.render = function (drawEngine) {
        drawEngine.render();
    };
};

var HeavyTank = function() {
    TankBase.apply(this, arguments);
    this.render = function() {
        console.log('heavyTank Render');
    }
}

function DecorateTankWithHealthIndicator (tank) {
    var oRender = tank.render;
    tank.render = function (drawEngine) {
        console.log('draw a health indicator');
        oRender.apply(tank, arguments);
    };
};

var btank = new TankBase();
var htank = new HeavyTank();
btank.render(DrawEngine);
htank.render(DrawEngine);
DecorateTankWithHealthIndicator(btank);
DecorateTankWithHealthIndicator(htank);
btank.render(DrawEngine);
htank.render(DrawEngine);
share|improve this answer
    
Yes! This is what I need! COOL! –  Warlock Jul 21 '13 at 10:51

In the following approach a tankBase object gets passed to the tankHealth function. The tankBase object gets modified within the tankHealth function, saving the tankBase object in the var that. After the modification that gets returned as the modified tankBase object.

var TankBase = function () {
        this.render = function () {
            console.log('tankBase')
        };
    }

var TankHealthDecorator = function (tank) {
    var that = tank;

    that.render = function() {
        console.log('tankHealth')
    };

    return that;
}

window.onload = function(){
    var tankBase = new TankBase();
    var testHealth = new TankHealthDecorator(new TankBase());

    tankBase.render();     // tank base
    testHealth.render();   // tank health
};
share|improve this answer
    
The problem is that I need to call tank.render() method inside that.render(). For example, that.render = function() { console.log('tankHealth'); tank.render(); }; And this leads to an infinite loop. –  Warlock Jul 20 '13 at 18:13
    
The "that" keyword in your example prevents problems when you forget the "new" keyword before TankHealthDecorator. This is not the Decorator pattern, but anyway THANKS!!! –  Warlock Jul 20 '13 at 18:18
    
You may also have a look at this article. It explains inheritance and the call of ancestor methods. –  Matthias Holdorf Jul 21 '13 at 6:50

The Decorator Pattern

Here is a rough implementation of the Decorator Pattern -- AKA: Wrapper:

Background:

The Decorator Pattern is typically used to add additional responsibilities to an object dynamically by forwarding requests onto its accepted Component, and|or decouple Deep Inheritance Hierarchies to be Compositive in Type (not to be confused with the Composite Pattern -- which is Compositive in Hierarchy -- using a Component-Leaf structure to allow synonymous requests across a uniform, fractal topology [treating parents & children equally]).

function AbstractComponent(){
    this.draw = function(){
        console.log('@AbstractComponent | #draw');
    };
}

function AbstractDecorator(){
    AbstractComponent.call(this);  // Inherit AbstractComponent Interface
    this.notify = function(){
        console.log('@AbstractDecorator | #notify');
    };
}

function ConcreteComponent(options){
    AbstractComponent.call(this);  // Inherit AbstractComponent Interface
    this.fill = function(){
        console.log('@ConcreteComponent | #fill');
    };
}

function ConcreteDecorator(Component){
    AbstractDecorator.call(this);  // Inherit AbstractDecorator Interface
    function PrivateResponsibility(){
        console.log('@ConcreteDecorator | #PrivateResponsibility');
    }
    this.additionalResponsibility = function(){
        console.log('@ConcreteDecorator | #additionalResponsibility');
    };
    this.draw = function(){
        console.log('@ConcreteDecorator | #draw-Component.draw');
        // ... additional logic
        PrivateResponsibility();
        Component.draw();
    };
    this.fill = function(){
        console.log('@ConcreteDecorator | #fill-Component.fill');
        Component.fill();
    };
}

var concreteComponent = new ConcreteComponent();
concreteComponent = new ConcreteDecorator(concreteComponent);  // use same variable name as to allow client code to remain the same

//CLIENT CODE
concreteComponent.draw();
concreteComponent.fill();
concreteComponent.notify();
concreteComponent.additionalResponsibility();
share|improve this answer

Following is my understanding about function(object) decoration

 function api_decorator(some_data){
     return function decorator(func){
        return function new_function(args){
         /* do somethinfg with data before and after func */
         console.log("I'm code before with data: "+some_data);
         func(args);
         console.log("I'm code after");
    }
  }
}

function somefunc(data){
    console.log("Hi, I'm func "+data);
}

somefunc("without decoration")
/* injecting somefunc in decorator api */
somefunc=api_decorator("data needed for api")(somefunc)
/* calling decorated with api somefunc */
somefunc("with decoration")
share|improve this answer
    
The Decorator Pattern is also known as a "Wrapper"... ... This IS a decorative pattern, known as the Function-Curry Pattern -- however, this is not THE Decorator Pattern. NO DOWN-VOTE because of its demonstration of DECORATING a function -- or, "Wrapping" a Logic-Set. –  Cody Sep 2 '14 at 21:49
    
decorator is decorative term ninja –  hardcode Apr 23 at 14:43

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