Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a table of STUDENTS which contains student information. Each student might or might not be a CANDIDATE in a college voting event, depending on the value of CANDIDATE BIT.

I'd like to have a table VOTE which keeps the votes of students, but I'd like to check if the student which is being inserted as VOTES_FOR is actually a CANDIDATE or not. In plain english: Check if the person being voted for is actually a candidate or not.

Any idea on how I can check for this constraint? I want to do this task using simple regular DDL commands not stored procedure and PL/SQL or T-SQL

CREATE TABLE STUDENTS(
    ID INT NOT NULL UNIQUE AUTO_INCREMENT = 1,
    FIRST_NAME NVARCHAR(20) NOT NULL ,
    LAST_NAME NVARCHAR(20) NOT NULL,
    CANDIDATE BIT DEFAULT '0',
    PRIMARY KEY(ID)
);    
CREATE TABLE VOTE(
    STUDENT_ID references STUDENTS(ID),
    VOTES_FOR references STUDENTS(ID),
    PRIMARY KEY STUDENT_ID
);
share|improve this question
    
i'm assuming that your goal is to prevent voting for non-candidates, is that correct? are you yourself constrained from preventing this in the application? –  ermagana Jul 20 '13 at 18:38
    
Yes that's right, I want to have in in table definition level, not in the application itself –  Arian Hosseinzadeh Jul 20 '13 at 18:42
    
I'm guessing you're using Oracle, by your mention of PL/SQL, is that right? –  ermagana Jul 20 '13 at 18:57
    
I am looking for the idea , not for the exact command , I want to know that if it's generally possible or not. –  Arian Hosseinzadeh Jul 20 '13 at 19:10
    
see my answer below; depending on the database, it can be achieved, but not through a simple declarative sql syntax. The Tony Andrews article give a very slick workaround. –  ermagana Jul 20 '13 at 19:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Declare a UNIQUE constraint on the pair of columns "ID" and "CANDIDATE", and reference that pair from the table "VOTES". Use a CHECK constraint in "VOTES" to guarantee that votes are recorded only for a candidate.

CREATE TABLE STUDENTS(
    ID INTEGER PRIMARY KEY,
    FIRST_NAME VARCHAR2(20) NOT NULL,
    LAST_NAME VARCHAR2(20) NOT NULL,
    CANDIDATE CHAR(1) DEFAULT 'f' NOT NULL 
      CHECK (CANDIDATE IN ('t', 'f')),
    UNIQUE (ID, CANDIDATE)
);

CREATE TABLE VOTES(
    STUDENT_ID INTEGER PRIMARY KEY
      REFERENCES STUDENTS (ID),
    VOTES_FOR INTEGER NOT NULL,
    CANDIDATE CHAR(1) DEFAULT 't' 
      CHECK (CANDIDATE = 't'),
    FOREIGN KEY (VOTES_FOR, CANDIDATE)
      REFERENCES STUDENTS (ID, CANDIDATE)
);

"IS_CANDIDATE" is probably a better name than "CANDIDATE"; "CANDIDATE_ID" is probably a better name than "VOTES_FOR".

share|improve this answer
    
@mike-sherrill-catcall out of curiousity, is there a reason you used a char(1) versus a bit field? This definitely solves the issue, great answer. –  ermagana Jul 22 '13 at 1:06
1  
a) Every dbms supports char(1). Most don't support bit data types. (That includes Oracle, your target platform.) b) The SQL:2003 standard dropped the bit type. c) Oracle doesn't support a Boolean data type in a CREATE TABLE statement. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Jul 22 '13 at 2:29

Right on for seeking a DDL solution for this type of problem.

I'd push towards incorporating a Candidate table. My reasoning is this will allow you to declare unique traits such as start and end candidacy times that would enable a student to try to become a candidate the following year or later.

Also this gives you an ID for that candidate to refer to.

CREATE TABLE student {
    id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY,
    fname VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL,
    lname VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL
};

CREATE TABLE candidate {
    id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY,
    student_id INTEGER(11) NOT NULL,
    start_year INTEGER(4) NOT NULL,
    start_month INTEGER(2) NOT NULL,
    start_day INTEGER(2) NOT NULL,
    end_year INTEGER(4) NULL,
    end_month INTEGER(2) NULL,
    end_day INTEGER(2) NULL
}

CREATE TABLE vote {
    student_id INTEGER(11) NOT NULL,
    candidate_id INTEGER(11) NOT NULL
};
share|improve this answer
    
That involves creating a new table and managing that table is a problem itself, I'd like to know if this is possible generally or not –  Arian Hosseinzadeh Jul 20 '13 at 19:11
    
It is a DDL solution. –  wurde Jul 20 '13 at 19:14
    
A Student is not a Candidate and I'm making the case that the DB should recognize this. –  wurde Jul 20 '13 at 19:15
    
I'll add example schema. –  wurde Jul 20 '13 at 19:17
    
Your current Candidate 'Bit' is acting as a Boolean for wither a student is a candidate. That is bad design and leads to the problems that lead to you creating this Q. –  wurde Jul 20 '13 at 19:23

If you're using Oracle and the database you want to look into a Ref Constraint here's an exmample Ref Constraint Example

Although the situation may be a little more complex than Oracle constraints allow for. This article written by Tony Andrews provides an ingenious workaround for achieving your desired results.

share|improve this answer

Have you tried using the SQL CHECK constraint?

http://www.w3schools.com/sql/sql_check.asp

You're going to need a composite foreign key to provide the check you want.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually the problem is that I don't want to check the value of the foreign key itself , I want to check the value of CANDIDATE in a row which is being referenced, and I am confused, how composite foreign key may help us here ? –  Arian Hosseinzadeh Jul 20 '13 at 18:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.