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When compiling this program in GHC:

import Control.Monad

f x = let
  g y = let
    h z = liftM not x
    in h 0
  in g 0

I receive an error:

test.hs:5:21:
    Could not deduce (m ~ m1)
    from the context (Monad m)
      bound by the inferred type of f :: Monad m => m Bool -> m Bool
      at test.hs:(3,1)-(7,8)
    or from (m Bool ~ m1 Bool, Monad m1)
      bound by the inferred type of
               h :: (m Bool ~ m1 Bool, Monad m1) => t1 -> m1 Bool
      at test.hs:5:5-21
      `m' is a rigid type variable bound by
          the inferred type of f :: Monad m => m Bool -> m Bool
          at test.hs:3:1
      `m1' is a rigid type variable bound by
           the inferred type of
           h :: (m Bool ~ m1 Bool, Monad m1) => t1 -> m1 Bool
           at test.hs:5:5
    Expected type: m1 Bool
      Actual type: m Bool
    In the second argument of `liftM', namely `x'
    In the expression: liftM not x
    In an equation for `h': h z = liftM not x

Why? Also, providing an explicit type signature for f (f :: Monad m => m Bool -> m Bool) makes the error disappear. But this is exactly the same type as the type that Haskell infers for f automatically, according to the error message!

share|improve this question
    
Monomorphism restriction? –  MathematicalOrchid Jul 20 '13 at 19:26
2  
Monomorphism restriction only applies to simple pattern bindings, and there are none here. Anyway, adding -XNoMonomorphismRestriction has no effect. –  abacabadabacaba Jul 20 '13 at 19:38
1  
I would think it's related to let-generalization, since the error disappears with -XMonoLocalBinds –  Matvey Aksenov Jul 20 '13 at 19:45

1 Answer 1

This is pretty straightforward, actually. The inferred types of let-bound variables are implicitly generalised to type schemes, so there’s a quantifier in your way. The generalised type of h is:

h :: forall a m. (Monad m) => a -> m Bool

And the generalised type of f is:

f :: forall m. (Monad m) => m Bool -> m Bool

They’re not the same m. You would get essentially the same error if you wrote this:

f :: (Monad m) => m Bool -> m Bool
f x = let
  g y = let
    h :: (Monad m) => a -> m Bool
    h z = liftM not x
    in h 0
  in g 0

And you could fix it by enabling the “scoped type variables” extension:

{-# LANGUAGE ScopedTypeVariables #-}

f :: forall m. (Monad m) => m Bool -> m Bool
f x = let
  g y = let
    h :: a -> m Bool
    h z = liftM not x
    in h 0
  in g 0

Or by disabling let-generalisation with the “monomorphic local bindings” extension, MonoLocalBinds.

share|improve this answer
3  
It's not that straightforward, since with ghc <= 7.6.1, the problem doesn't arise, even with explicit NoMonoLocalBinds. The behaviour changed with 7.6.2, I don't know whether intentionally, or accidentally. –  Daniel Fischer Jul 20 '13 at 20:15
    
Why doesn't this happen to f x = let g y = liftM not x in g 0? The type of g should be generalized in the same way. –  abacabadabacaba Jul 20 '13 at 20:29
2  
Maybe it is a bug then. In which case the question and answer are a good repro case and place to start looking. –  Jon Purdy Jul 20 '13 at 22:52

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